MICROVASCULAR BLOOD RHEOLOGY &RED BLOOD CELL MECHANICS

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

It is proposed to develop theoretical models which relate the rheology of
blood in microvessels to the mechanical properties of individual red blood
cells. The rheological properties of blood are crucial both to the role of
the circulation in mass transport to and from tissues, and to the
mechanical load on the heart resulting from peripheral resistance. Because
normal red cells are highly deformable, blood flows readily through the
smallest vessels in the microcirculation, whose diameters are less than
that of undeformed red cells. The elastic and viscous properties of red
cells have been much studied and are now fairly well established. This
allows the development of detailed quantitative models describing the
deformations of red cells in microvessels, and predicting the resulting
microvascular rheological properties of blood. The focus of the proposed research will be flow in capillaries in which red
cells flow in single file or in two files. Previous models for single-file
flow have generally assumed axisymmetric cell shapes. We propose to
develop models showing the consequences of non-axisymmetry in single-file
flow, including the phenomenon of "tank-treading". In two-file flow, a
staggered arrangement of cells called "zipper" flow is frequently
observed. The rheological consequences of tank-treading are potentially
important in this flow, and will be studied. Techniques developed in these
studies of flow in uniform vessels will provide a basis for modeling the
motion of red cells in diverging capillary bifurcations. Although the proposed work is theoretical, it relies heavily on interaction
with experimental hemorheologists. In pursuing these studies, the
principal investigator intends to continue and extend his existing
collaboration with Professor P. Gaehtgens (Berlin, West Germany), who is a
leader in this field. Experimental observations of Dr. Gaehtgens and other
hemorheologists form the starting point for most of the proposed studies,
and as the work proceeds the results and predictions will be regularly
compared and tested against available experimental data.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/1/853/31/17

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $150,728.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $148,593.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $151,500.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $151,500.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $185,906.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $148,593.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $183,117.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $182,189.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $148,817.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $176,983.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $185,906.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $151,500.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $99,134.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $102,063.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $148,593.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $148,593.00
  • National Institutes of Health

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

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