REGULATION AND EXCHANGE IN THE MICROCIRCULATION

  • Secomb, Timothy W (PI)
  • Gore, Robert (PI)
  • Popel, Aleksander (PI)
  • Baldwin, A.N.N. (PI)
  • Intaglietta, Marcos (PI)
  • Schaffer, Richard (PI)
  • Gross, Joseph (PI)
  • Johnson, Paul (PI)
  • Johnson, R. Paul (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

The goal of this program-project is to better understand how the
microcirculation creates and maintains an appropriate environment for the
parenchymal cells. To achieve this goal we will study the fundamental
processes of regulation and exchange in the microcirculation and certain
inter-relationships between these two functions. A significant portion
of the effort will be devoted to examining the behavior or individual
microcirculatory vessels as well as the organized networks which they
comprise. We will also examine the manner in which oxygen is delivered
by the microcirculatory system to the parenchymal cells and the
variations in tissue metabolism and oxygen delivery under different
circumstances. We will also study the nature of the exchange barriers in
the microcirculation for lipid-insoluble substances and the effect of
these barriers in the microcirculation for lipid-insoluble substances and
the effect of these barriers on the environment of the parenchymal cells.
The program-project is being expanded substantially to add new studies on
the function of the microcirculation at the cellular level. These
studies are made possible by technical developments which enable us to
examine questions of continuing interest to this project with new
methods. By examining microcirculatory function at several levels as
well as the interrelationships among separate functions we aim to achieve
a better understanding of the manner in which the microcirculation
supports normal parenchymal cell function. One of the distinguishing
features of this program-project is the interdisciplinary nature of the
research. The group has special expertise in the areas of physiology,
engineering, applied mathematics, morphology and cell biology. At least
two of these disciplines are represented in the typical project in the
program-project. While the emphasis in the program is on the advancement
of scientific understanding, we recognize that scientific advances are
very dependent upon technological developments. Therefore, a portion of
the activities of the program are directed to development of new
instrumentation.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/748/31/95

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

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