2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care

Dianne L. Atkins, Allan R. de Caen, Stuart Berger, Ricardo A Samson, Stephen M. Schexnayder, Benny L. Joyner, Blair L. Bigham, Dana E. Niles, Jonathan P. Duff, Elizabeth A. Hunt, Peter A. Meaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This focused update to the American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care follows the Pediatric Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation evidence review. It aligns with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's continuous evidence review process, and updates are published when the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation completes a literature review based on new science. This update provides the evidence review and treatment recommendation for chest compression-only CPR versus CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths for children <18 years of age. Four large database studies were available for review, including 2 published after the "2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care." Two demonstrated worse 30-day outcomes with chest compression-only CPR for children 1 through 18 years of age, whereas 2 studies documented no difference between chest compression-only CPR and CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths. When the results were analyzed for infants <1 year of age, CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths was better than no CPR but was no different from chest compression-only CPR in 1 study, whereas another study observed no differences among chest compression-only CPR, CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths, and no CPR. CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths should be provided for infants and children in cardiac arrest. If bystanders are unwilling or unable to deliver rescue breaths, we recommend that rescuers provide chest compressions for infants and children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCirculation
Volume137
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2018

Fingerprint

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Emergency Medical Services
Guidelines
Pediatrics
Thorax
Resuscitation
Advisory Committees
Heart Arrest

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • AHA Scientific Statements
  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • child
  • heart arrest
  • heart massage
  • infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality : An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. / Atkins, Dianne L.; de Caen, Allan R.; Berger, Stuart; Samson, Ricardo A; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Joyner, Benny L.; Bigham, Blair L.; Niles, Dana E.; Duff, Jonathan P.; Hunt, Elizabeth A.; Meaney, Peter A.

In: Circulation, Vol. 137, No. 1, 02.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Atkins, Dianne L. ; de Caen, Allan R. ; Berger, Stuart ; Samson, Ricardo A ; Schexnayder, Stephen M. ; Joyner, Benny L. ; Bigham, Blair L. ; Niles, Dana E. ; Duff, Jonathan P. ; Hunt, Elizabeth A. ; Meaney, Peter A. / 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality : An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. In: Circulation. 2018 ; Vol. 137, No. 1.
@article{05e26816221d41dba3580876bf6cdeda,
title = "2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care",
abstract = "This focused update to the American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care follows the Pediatric Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation evidence review. It aligns with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's continuous evidence review process, and updates are published when the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation completes a literature review based on new science. This update provides the evidence review and treatment recommendation for chest compression-only CPR versus CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths for children <18 years of age. Four large database studies were available for review, including 2 published after the {"}2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.{"} Two demonstrated worse 30-day outcomes with chest compression-only CPR for children 1 through 18 years of age, whereas 2 studies documented no difference between chest compression-only CPR and CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths. When the results were analyzed for infants <1 year of age, CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths was better than no CPR but was no different from chest compression-only CPR in 1 study, whereas another study observed no differences among chest compression-only CPR, CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths, and no CPR. CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths should be provided for infants and children in cardiac arrest. If bystanders are unwilling or unable to deliver rescue breaths, we recommend that rescuers provide chest compressions for infants and children.",
keywords = "adolescent, AHA Scientific Statements, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, child, heart arrest, heart massage, infant",
author = "Atkins, {Dianne L.} and {de Caen}, {Allan R.} and Stuart Berger and Samson, {Ricardo A} and Schexnayder, {Stephen M.} and Joyner, {Benny L.} and Bigham, {Blair L.} and Niles, {Dana E.} and Duff, {Jonathan P.} and Hunt, {Elizabeth A.} and Meaney, {Peter A.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1161/CIR.0000000000000540",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "137",
journal = "Circulation",
issn = "0009-7322",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality

T2 - An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care

AU - Atkins, Dianne L.

AU - de Caen, Allan R.

AU - Berger, Stuart

AU - Samson, Ricardo A

AU - Schexnayder, Stephen M.

AU - Joyner, Benny L.

AU - Bigham, Blair L.

AU - Niles, Dana E.

AU - Duff, Jonathan P.

AU - Hunt, Elizabeth A.

AU - Meaney, Peter A.

PY - 2018/1/2

Y1 - 2018/1/2

N2 - This focused update to the American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care follows the Pediatric Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation evidence review. It aligns with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's continuous evidence review process, and updates are published when the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation completes a literature review based on new science. This update provides the evidence review and treatment recommendation for chest compression-only CPR versus CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths for children <18 years of age. Four large database studies were available for review, including 2 published after the "2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care." Two demonstrated worse 30-day outcomes with chest compression-only CPR for children 1 through 18 years of age, whereas 2 studies documented no difference between chest compression-only CPR and CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths. When the results were analyzed for infants <1 year of age, CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths was better than no CPR but was no different from chest compression-only CPR in 1 study, whereas another study observed no differences among chest compression-only CPR, CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths, and no CPR. CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths should be provided for infants and children in cardiac arrest. If bystanders are unwilling or unable to deliver rescue breaths, we recommend that rescuers provide chest compressions for infants and children.

AB - This focused update to the American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care follows the Pediatric Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation evidence review. It aligns with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's continuous evidence review process, and updates are published when the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation completes a literature review based on new science. This update provides the evidence review and treatment recommendation for chest compression-only CPR versus CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths for children <18 years of age. Four large database studies were available for review, including 2 published after the "2015 American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care." Two demonstrated worse 30-day outcomes with chest compression-only CPR for children 1 through 18 years of age, whereas 2 studies documented no difference between chest compression-only CPR and CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths. When the results were analyzed for infants <1 year of age, CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths was better than no CPR but was no different from chest compression-only CPR in 1 study, whereas another study observed no differences among chest compression-only CPR, CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths, and no CPR. CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths should be provided for infants and children in cardiac arrest. If bystanders are unwilling or unable to deliver rescue breaths, we recommend that rescuers provide chest compressions for infants and children.

KW - adolescent

KW - AHA Scientific Statements

KW - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

KW - child

KW - heart arrest

KW - heart massage

KW - infant

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048292045&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048292045&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000540

DO - 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000540

M3 - Article

C2 - 29114009

AN - SCOPUS:85048292045

VL - 137

JO - Circulation

JF - Circulation

SN - 0009-7322

IS - 1

ER -