A city of workers, a city for workers? Remaking beijing Urban space in the early PRC

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 1950s’ Beijing, planners conjured up a city that could fulfill three different but inseparable functions: it should be a productive city, with a sizable industrial proletariat; it should serve as the host of a vast bureaucracy; and it should be remade into a more perfect urban structure, in which the people’s needs could be satisfied and themselves remade into new socialist individuals. This chapter traces the increasing distance between the projects of the planners and practices at street level, where the needs of bureaucracy and production led to scattered urban development and to continuing forms of oppression. I argue that these contradictions-reflected in Beijing’s urban structure-were intrinsic to the very project of Maoist modernization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationChina
Subtitle of host publicationA Historical Geography of the Urban
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages41-65
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9783319640426
ISBN (Print)9783319640419
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

urban structure
bureaucracy
proletariat
worker
oppression
urban development
modernization
Urban Space
Bureaucracy
Remake
Beijing
Workers
Intrinsic
Proletariat
1950s
Urban Development
Modernization
Socialist
Oppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Lanza, F. . (2017). A city of workers, a city for workers? Remaking beijing Urban space in the early PRC. In China: A Historical Geography of the Urban (pp. 41-65). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64042-6_3

A city of workers, a city for workers? Remaking beijing Urban space in the early PRC. / Lanza, Fabio -.

China: A Historical Geography of the Urban. Springer International Publishing, 2017. p. 41-65.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Lanza, F 2017, A city of workers, a city for workers? Remaking beijing Urban space in the early PRC. in China: A Historical Geography of the Urban. Springer International Publishing, pp. 41-65. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64042-6_3
Lanza F. A city of workers, a city for workers? Remaking beijing Urban space in the early PRC. In China: A Historical Geography of the Urban. Springer International Publishing. 2017. p. 41-65 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64042-6_3
Lanza, Fabio -. / A city of workers, a city for workers? Remaking beijing Urban space in the early PRC. China: A Historical Geography of the Urban. Springer International Publishing, 2017. pp. 41-65
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