A computational method to identify residues important in creating a protein promoting vibration in enzymes

Joshua S. Mincer, Steven D Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we present a computational method to screen a large set of protein residues to identify those residues the motions of which help create a protein promoting vibration and are therefore important for catalysis. The method is illustrated for the case of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH). In this system, the protein promoting vibration is the relative motion between hydride donor and acceptor, that is, the benzyl alcohol substrate and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) cofactor, respectively. The resulting subset of screened residues compares favorably with existing experimental data and also suggests additional residues as objects for potential study. The method presented in this paper employs correlated motion as the basis for identifying residues important in catalysis. As such, the success of the method in the case of HLADH further supports the importance of protein dynamics in certain enzyme systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-371
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume107
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 9 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Computational methods
enzymes
Enzymes
proteins
Proteins
vibration
Alcohols
Alcohol Dehydrogenase
horses
alcohols
dehydrogenases
Liver
NAD
Catalysis
liver
catalysis
Benzyl Alcohol
nicotinamide
Catalyst supports
Hydrides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

A computational method to identify residues important in creating a protein promoting vibration in enzymes. / Mincer, Joshua S.; Schwartz, Steven D.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 107, No. 1, 09.01.2003, p. 366-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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