A cross-sectional study of human papillomavirus vaccine utilization among university women: The role of ethnicity, race, and risk factors

Velia Leybas Nuno, Marisa Gonzalez, Salena Meyer Loredo, Brittany M. Nigon, Francisco A Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A cross-sectional study of university women demonstrates that HPV vaccine use differed by ethnic group. Supplemental digital content is available in the text. Objective We estimated the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination by ethnicity and race and compared vaccination use by known risk factors. Materials and Methods We applied a cross-sectional design using an anonymous, online survey distributed in 2011 to female undergraduates (n = 284) between the ages of 18 and 26 years. The study was approved by the University of Arizona Institutional Review Board. Results Overall, 55% of women reported receiving the HPV vaccine. Within racial and ethnic groups, HPV vaccination was highest among American Indian/Alaska Native women with 71%, followed by Hispanic women with 68%, black/African American women with 58%, white women with 51%, and Asian/Pacific Island women with 31%. Moreover, Hispanic women were twice as likely to be vaccinated compared with white women (OR = 2.08; 95% CI = 1.14-3.78). Among unvaccinated women, 55% had discussed HPV with a provider and 56% had reported no concerns about the vaccine and/or had high levels of HPV knowledge. Conclusions Human papillomavirus vaccine is highly acceptable among college women, particularly among Hispanic women. Efforts to vaccinate should include time of college enrollment. Such efforts are critical for the large scale prevention of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions and ultimately for preventable cervical cancer mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-134
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Lower Genital Tract Disease
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Papillomavirus Vaccines
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hispanic Americans
Vaccination
Ethnic Groups
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Pacific Islands
North American Indians
Research Ethics Committees
African Americans
Vaccines

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • HPV vaccine
  • Race
  • University
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

A cross-sectional study of human papillomavirus vaccine utilization among university women : The role of ethnicity, race, and risk factors. / Nuno, Velia Leybas; Gonzalez, Marisa; Loredo, Salena Meyer; Nigon, Brittany M.; Garcia, Francisco A.

In: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.04.2016, p. 131-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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