A cross-sectional study of shrimp pathogens in wild shrimp, Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus stylirostris in Tumbes, Peru

Beder Ramírez, Mervin Guevara, Rubén Alfaro, Vanessa Montoya, Hung N. Mai, María Serna, Arun K. Dhar, Luis Fernando Aranguren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We report the results of a longitudinal, cross-sectional study on the prevalence of some of the most important shrimp pathogens in wild shrimp located near Tumbes, the most productive shrimp farming area in Peru. Two enteric pathogens (Baculovirus penaei, BP and Hepatobacter penaei, NHP) and two systemic pathogens (infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus, IHHNV and white spot syndrome virus, WSSV) were detected in wild shrimp Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus stylirostris. Shrimp (n = 9,030) were collected from seven tidal channels of mangrove over 9 months (April through December) during 2012 through 2016. Screening for H. penaei, BP, IHHNV and WSSV were conducted by PCR or qPCR following the OIE-recommended methods. The prevalence of these pathogens was below 3% during the study period, with the prevalence trend being BP > H. penaei > WSSV > IHHNV. The overall trend in IHHNV, H. penaei and WSSV prevalence was similar in both species, P. stylirostris and P. vannamei (p >.05). It was interesting to note that BP prevalence was significantly higher in P. stylirostris than P. vannamei (p <.001). The presence of the enteric and systemic pathogens in the wild shrimp population partially explains the presence of the diseases in the nearby shrimp farming areas, which confirms the risk of wild shrimp as a potential carrier for shrimp pathogens in Tumbes, Peru.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1118-1126
Number of pages9
JournalAquaculture Research
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • BP
  • Hepatobacter penaei
  • IHHNV
  • WSSV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

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