A dendroecological assessment of whitebark pine in the Sawtooth - Salmon River region, Idaho

Dana L. Perkins, Thomas Swetnam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) tree-ring chronologies of 700 to greater than 1000 years in length were developed for four sites in the Sawtooth - Salmon River region, central Idaho. These ring-width chronologies were used to (i) assess the dendrochronological characteristics of this species, (ii) detect annual mortality dates of whitebark pine attributed to a widespread mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)) epidemic during the 1909-1940 period, and (iii) establish the response of whitebark pine ring-width growth to climate variables. Cross-dating of whitebark pine tree-ring patterns was verified. Ring-width indices had low mean sensitivity (0.123-0.174), typical of high-elevation conifers in western North America, and variable first-order autocorrelation (0.206-0.551). Mountain pine beetle caused mortality of dominant whitebark pine peaked in 1930 on all four sites. Response functions and correlation analyses with state divisional weather records indicate that above-average radial growth is positively correlated with winter and spring precipitation and inversely correlated with May temperature. These correlations appear to be a response to seasonal snowpack. Whitebark pine is a promising species for dendroclimatic studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2123-2133
Number of pages11
JournalCanadian Journal of Forest Research
Volume26
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1996

Fingerprint

Pinus albicaulis
tree ring
salmon
chronology
beetle
mortality
rivers
mountain
snowpack
river
autocorrelation
coniferous tree
weather
winter
climate
Coleoptera
growth rings
temperature
mountains
Dendroctonus ponderosae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Plant Science

Cite this

A dendroecological assessment of whitebark pine in the Sawtooth - Salmon River region, Idaho. / Perkins, Dana L.; Swetnam, Thomas.

In: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 26, No. 12, 12.1996, p. 2123-2133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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