A feminist approach to university- industry relations

Integrating theories of gender, knowledge, and capital

Laurel Smith-Doerr, Jennifer L Croissant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Ever more frequently and globally, universities partner with for-profit firms. This paper explains why information about university-industry ties is relevant to global justice issues and should be garnering critical scrutiny from various feminist perspectives. Knowledge about university-industry ties aids in understanding of: (1) nonhierarchical structures; (2) academic capitalism and intellectual property laws; (3) how exclusion of women from technoscience networks shapes technology, commodifies women's bodies, and has implications for justice in developing nations. University-industry relationships are major mechanisms in the production and development of knowledge and its intersections with systems of social hierarchy, and the complex globalization of structures, laws, technologies, and bodies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-269
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering
Volume17
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

industry
university
gender
justice
Industry
Law
Intellectual property
intellectual property
capitalist society
Profitability
profit
exclusion
globalization
firm

Keywords

  • Academic capitalism
  • Feminist science studies
  • Gendered organization
  • University-industry collaboration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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