A finite element study on variations in mass transport in stented porcine coronary arteries based on location in the coronary arterial tree

Joseph T. Keyes, Bruce R. Simon, Jonathan P. Vande Geest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drug-eluting stents have a significant clinical advantage in late-stage restenosis due to the antiproliferative drug release. Understanding how drug transport occurs between coronary arterial locations can better help guide localized drug treatment options. Finite element models with properties from specific porcine coronary artery sections (left anterior descending (LAD), right (RCA); proximal, middle, distal regions) were created for stent deployment and drug delivery simulations. Stress, strain, pore fluid velocity, and drug concentrations were exported at different time points of simulation (0-180 days). Tests indicated that the highest stresses occurred in LAD sections. Higher-than-resting homeostatic levels of stress and strain existed at upwards of 3.0 mm away from the stented region, whereas concentration of species only reached 2.7 mm away from the stented region. Region-specific concentration showed 2.2 times higher concentrations in RCA artery sections at times corresponding to vascular remodeling (peak in the middle segment) compared to all other segments. These results suggest that wall transport can occur differently based on coronary artery location. Awareness of peak growth stimulators and where drug accumulation occurs in the vasculature can better help guide local drug delivery therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number061008
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume135
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 28 2013

Keywords

  • Coronary
  • Drug
  • Porohyperelastic mass transport
  • Simulation
  • Stent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

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