A juvenile–adult population model

climate change, cannibalism, reproductive synchrony, and strong Allee effects

Amy Veprauskas, Jim M Cushing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We study a discrete time, structured population dynamic model that is motivated by recent field observations concerning certain life history strategies of colonial-nesting gulls, specifically the glaucous-winged gull (Larus glaucescens). The model focuses on mechanisms hypothesized to play key roles in a population's response to degraded environment resources, namely, increased cannibalism and adjustments in reproductive timing. We explore the dynamic consequences of these mechanics using a juvenile–adult structure model. Mathematically, the model is unusual in that it involves a high co-dimension bifurcation at (Formula presented.) which, in turn, leads to a dynamic dichotomy between equilibrium states and synchronized oscillatory states. We give diagnostic criteria that determine which dynamic is stable. We also explore strong Allee effects caused by positive feedback mechanisms in the model and the possible consequence that a cannibalistic population can survive when a non-cannibalistic population cannot.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-24
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Biological Dynamics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 30 2016

Fingerprint

Allee effect
cannibalism
synchrony
climate change
Laridae
Larus
mechanics
dynamic models
feedback mechanism
bifurcation
population dynamics
life history
resource

Keywords

  • bifurcation
  • cannibalism
  • equilibrium
  • imprimitive projection matrix models
  • reproductive synchrony
  • Structured population dynamics
  • synchronous cycles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

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