A match made in heaven? Trying to combine ACS-NSQIP and NCDB databases

Cindy B. Matsen, Stephen L. Luther, Andrew K. Stewart, William G. Henderson, Hyein Kim, Leigh A Neumayer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: As part of a larger study evaluating breast cancer care, we attempted to validate our matching strategies between the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) and ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). Methods: Using 2002-2006 data, we attempted to match cases by a three-tiered approach. Three groups resulted: (1) successfully matched, (2) NCDB case with no corresponding match in ACS-NSQIP, and (3) ACS-NSQIP case with no match in NCDB. Single institution (University of Utah) data were used for a nested validation study of the unmatched groups. Results: The initial match yielded a 23.4% net match rate (rate of 8.6% at the University of Utah). In subset review of unmatched University of Utah cancer registry cases (NCDB, n = 153), 56% (n = 86) of cases had their index surgery at the University of Utah, with 15 potential matches in the unmatched ACS-NSQIP data using age and date of surgery and no potential match for 41 cases. Twenty-five remaining cases had a potential surgery date match if age was varied by 1 y with 18 confirmed matches. Review of unmatched ACS-NSQIP cases (n = 107) yielded 15 potential matches in the University of Utah cancer registry, with no potential match for 63 cases. Twenty-nine cases had a potential surgery date match if age was varied, with 26 confirmed matches. Review of ACS-NSQIP cases from 2006 for cancer status and stage revealed two cancer patients who were not in the cancer registry. Conclusions: Linking ACS-NSQIP and NCDB without a captive patient population results in low overall match rates due, in part, to specific inclusion criteria and different variable definitions for each database.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-11
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume175
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Quality Improvement
Databases
Neoplasms
Registries
Validation Studies
Breast Neoplasms

Keywords

  • ACS-NSQIP
  • breast cancer
  • cancer registry
  • clinical databases
  • Commission on Cancer
  • matching
  • NCDB
  • validation study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

A match made in heaven? Trying to combine ACS-NSQIP and NCDB databases. / Matsen, Cindy B.; Luther, Stephen L.; Stewart, Andrew K.; Henderson, William G.; Kim, Hyein; Neumayer, Leigh A.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 175, No. 1, 01.06.2012, p. 6-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsen, Cindy B. ; Luther, Stephen L. ; Stewart, Andrew K. ; Henderson, William G. ; Kim, Hyein ; Neumayer, Leigh A. / A match made in heaven? Trying to combine ACS-NSQIP and NCDB databases. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2012 ; Vol. 175, No. 1. pp. 6-11.
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abstract = "Background: As part of a larger study evaluating breast cancer care, we attempted to validate our matching strategies between the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) and ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). Methods: Using 2002-2006 data, we attempted to match cases by a three-tiered approach. Three groups resulted: (1) successfully matched, (2) NCDB case with no corresponding match in ACS-NSQIP, and (3) ACS-NSQIP case with no match in NCDB. Single institution (University of Utah) data were used for a nested validation study of the unmatched groups. Results: The initial match yielded a 23.4{\%} net match rate (rate of 8.6{\%} at the University of Utah). In subset review of unmatched University of Utah cancer registry cases (NCDB, n = 153), 56{\%} (n = 86) of cases had their index surgery at the University of Utah, with 15 potential matches in the unmatched ACS-NSQIP data using age and date of surgery and no potential match for 41 cases. Twenty-five remaining cases had a potential surgery date match if age was varied by 1 y with 18 confirmed matches. Review of unmatched ACS-NSQIP cases (n = 107) yielded 15 potential matches in the University of Utah cancer registry, with no potential match for 63 cases. Twenty-nine cases had a potential surgery date match if age was varied, with 26 confirmed matches. Review of ACS-NSQIP cases from 2006 for cancer status and stage revealed two cancer patients who were not in the cancer registry. Conclusions: Linking ACS-NSQIP and NCDB without a captive patient population results in low overall match rates due, in part, to specific inclusion criteria and different variable definitions for each database.",
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