A mindful eating intervention: A theory-guided randomized anti-obesity feasibility study with adolescent Latino females

Patricia Daly, Thaddeus Wesley Warren Pace, Judith Berg, Usha Menon, Laura A. Szalacha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While pediatric anti-obesity lifestyle interventions have received considerable attention, few show sustained impact on body mass index (BMI). Using the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Theory as a framework, we examined the effects of a satiety-focused mindful eating intervention (MEI) on BMI, weight and mindful awareness. Method Design and Setting: Utilizing a two-group, repeated measures design, 37 adolescent females with a BMI >90th percentile, recruited from a public high school in a Latino community in the Southwestern United States, were randomized 2:1, one third to the group receiving a 6-week MEI and two thirds to the comparison group (CG) receiving the usual care (nutrition and exercise information). Intervention: During six weekly 90-min after school MEI group sessions, the behavioral skills of slow intentional eating were practiced with foci on satiety cues and triggers to overeat. Outcomes: Feasibility and acceptability were measured as participant retention (goal ≥55%) and evaluative comments from those in the MEI group, respectively. BMI and mindful awareness were measured on site at baseline, immediately post intervention, and at 4-week follow-up (week 10). Results Fifty-seven and 65% of those in the MEI and CG were retained throughout the study, respectively. MEI participants showed significantly lowered BMI compared with CG participants, whose weight increased (p < 0.001). At six weeks, the MEI group BMI decreased by 1.1 kg/m2 (BMI continued to decline to 1.4 kg/m2 by week 10); while CG BMI increased by 0.7 kg/m2 (consistent with BMI >90th percentile standard growth projections). Conclusions Initial and sustained decline of BMI in the MEI group supports further study of this theory-guided approach, and the value of practicing satiety-focused mindful eating behavioral skills to facilitate health behavior change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-28
Number of pages7
JournalComplementary Therapies in Medicine
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Feasibility Studies
Hispanic Americans
Obesity
Eating
Body Mass Index
Southwestern United States
Weights and Measures
Pediatric Obesity
Health Behavior
Cues
Life Style
Motivation
Exercise
Growth

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Female
  • Latino
  • Mindful eating
  • Mindfulness
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and Manual Therapy
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

A mindful eating intervention : A theory-guided randomized anti-obesity feasibility study with adolescent Latino females. / Daly, Patricia; Pace, Thaddeus Wesley Warren; Berg, Judith; Menon, Usha; Szalacha, Laura A.

In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Vol. 28, 01.10.2016, p. 22-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2594e013a2ef451d8801eb621d1dfe75,
title = "A mindful eating intervention: A theory-guided randomized anti-obesity feasibility study with adolescent Latino females",
abstract = "While pediatric anti-obesity lifestyle interventions have received considerable attention, few show sustained impact on body mass index (BMI). Using the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Theory as a framework, we examined the effects of a satiety-focused mindful eating intervention (MEI) on BMI, weight and mindful awareness. Method Design and Setting: Utilizing a two-group, repeated measures design, 37 adolescent females with a BMI >90th percentile, recruited from a public high school in a Latino community in the Southwestern United States, were randomized 2:1, one third to the group receiving a 6-week MEI and two thirds to the comparison group (CG) receiving the usual care (nutrition and exercise information). Intervention: During six weekly 90-min after school MEI group sessions, the behavioral skills of slow intentional eating were practiced with foci on satiety cues and triggers to overeat. Outcomes: Feasibility and acceptability were measured as participant retention (goal ≥55{\%}) and evaluative comments from those in the MEI group, respectively. BMI and mindful awareness were measured on site at baseline, immediately post intervention, and at 4-week follow-up (week 10). Results Fifty-seven and 65{\%} of those in the MEI and CG were retained throughout the study, respectively. MEI participants showed significantly lowered BMI compared with CG participants, whose weight increased (p < 0.001). At six weeks, the MEI group BMI decreased by 1.1 kg/m2 (BMI continued to decline to 1.4 kg/m2 by week 10); while CG BMI increased by 0.7 kg/m2 (consistent with BMI >90th percentile standard growth projections). Conclusions Initial and sustained decline of BMI in the MEI group supports further study of this theory-guided approach, and the value of practicing satiety-focused mindful eating behavioral skills to facilitate health behavior change.",
keywords = "Adolescents, Female, Latino, Mindful eating, Mindfulness, Obesity",
author = "Patricia Daly and Pace, {Thaddeus Wesley Warren} and Judith Berg and Usha Menon and Szalacha, {Laura A.}",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ctim.2016.07.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "22--28",
journal = "Complementary Therapies in Medicine",
issn = "0965-2299",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A mindful eating intervention

T2 - A theory-guided randomized anti-obesity feasibility study with adolescent Latino females

AU - Daly, Patricia

AU - Pace, Thaddeus Wesley Warren

AU - Berg, Judith

AU - Menon, Usha

AU - Szalacha, Laura A.

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - While pediatric anti-obesity lifestyle interventions have received considerable attention, few show sustained impact on body mass index (BMI). Using the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Theory as a framework, we examined the effects of a satiety-focused mindful eating intervention (MEI) on BMI, weight and mindful awareness. Method Design and Setting: Utilizing a two-group, repeated measures design, 37 adolescent females with a BMI >90th percentile, recruited from a public high school in a Latino community in the Southwestern United States, were randomized 2:1, one third to the group receiving a 6-week MEI and two thirds to the comparison group (CG) receiving the usual care (nutrition and exercise information). Intervention: During six weekly 90-min after school MEI group sessions, the behavioral skills of slow intentional eating were practiced with foci on satiety cues and triggers to overeat. Outcomes: Feasibility and acceptability were measured as participant retention (goal ≥55%) and evaluative comments from those in the MEI group, respectively. BMI and mindful awareness were measured on site at baseline, immediately post intervention, and at 4-week follow-up (week 10). Results Fifty-seven and 65% of those in the MEI and CG were retained throughout the study, respectively. MEI participants showed significantly lowered BMI compared with CG participants, whose weight increased (p < 0.001). At six weeks, the MEI group BMI decreased by 1.1 kg/m2 (BMI continued to decline to 1.4 kg/m2 by week 10); while CG BMI increased by 0.7 kg/m2 (consistent with BMI >90th percentile standard growth projections). Conclusions Initial and sustained decline of BMI in the MEI group supports further study of this theory-guided approach, and the value of practicing satiety-focused mindful eating behavioral skills to facilitate health behavior change.

AB - While pediatric anti-obesity lifestyle interventions have received considerable attention, few show sustained impact on body mass index (BMI). Using the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Theory as a framework, we examined the effects of a satiety-focused mindful eating intervention (MEI) on BMI, weight and mindful awareness. Method Design and Setting: Utilizing a two-group, repeated measures design, 37 adolescent females with a BMI >90th percentile, recruited from a public high school in a Latino community in the Southwestern United States, were randomized 2:1, one third to the group receiving a 6-week MEI and two thirds to the comparison group (CG) receiving the usual care (nutrition and exercise information). Intervention: During six weekly 90-min after school MEI group sessions, the behavioral skills of slow intentional eating were practiced with foci on satiety cues and triggers to overeat. Outcomes: Feasibility and acceptability were measured as participant retention (goal ≥55%) and evaluative comments from those in the MEI group, respectively. BMI and mindful awareness were measured on site at baseline, immediately post intervention, and at 4-week follow-up (week 10). Results Fifty-seven and 65% of those in the MEI and CG were retained throughout the study, respectively. MEI participants showed significantly lowered BMI compared with CG participants, whose weight increased (p < 0.001). At six weeks, the MEI group BMI decreased by 1.1 kg/m2 (BMI continued to decline to 1.4 kg/m2 by week 10); while CG BMI increased by 0.7 kg/m2 (consistent with BMI >90th percentile standard growth projections). Conclusions Initial and sustained decline of BMI in the MEI group supports further study of this theory-guided approach, and the value of practicing satiety-focused mindful eating behavioral skills to facilitate health behavior change.

KW - Adolescents

KW - Female

KW - Latino

KW - Mindful eating

KW - Mindfulness

KW - Obesity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84982801663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84982801663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.07.006

DO - 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.07.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 27670866

AN - SCOPUS:84982801663

VL - 28

SP - 22

EP - 28

JO - Complementary Therapies in Medicine

JF - Complementary Therapies in Medicine

SN - 0965-2299

ER -