A mixed infection of Lettuce chlorosis virus, papaya ringspot virus, and tomato yellow leaf curl virus-IL detected in a Texas papaya orchard affected by a virus-like disease outbreak

Olufemi J. Alabi, M. Al Rwahnih, J. L. Jifon, M. Sétamou, J. K. Brown, L. Gregg, J. W. Park

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Severe virus-like symptoms consisting of mosaic, distortion, yellowing, and brittleness were observed on papaya plants in a 20-ha orchard in South Texas during the 2014–15 growing season. Incidence of symptomatic plants increased from ∼40 to 100% within 6 months of the outbreak; the most severely affected plants were stunted, and fruit yield and quality were reduced compared with asymptomatic plants. The orchard papaya plant virome was explored using the Illumina NextSeq 500 platform and results were validated by Sanger DNA sequencing of complete viral genomes obtained by PCR amplification. The combined results revealed the presence of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV; Potyvirus), Lettuce chlorosis virus (LCV; Crinivirus), and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-IL (TYLCV-IL; Begomovirus). The RT-PCR analyses of leaves from 51 randomly sampled papaya plants indicated the presence of PRSV, LCV, and TYLCV-IL in 100, 39.2, and 15.7% of the samples, respectively. Plants infected with PRSV, in combination with LCV and/or TYLCV-IL, exhibited more severe symptoms compared with plants infected with PRSV alone. Furthermore, successful whitefly-mediated transmission of TYLCV-IL and LCV was accomplished by exposing virus-free papaya seedlings to viruliferous Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) under greenhouse conditions. The results of this study document a new host record for LCV and the first successful whitefly-mediated transmission of TYLCV-IL and LCV to papaya. As a perennial crop, infected papaya serving as an over-seasoning reservoir for TYLCV-IL and LCV, presents a new challenge to viral disease management in papaya orchards.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1094-1102
Number of pages9
JournalPlant Disease
Volume101
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Lettuce chlorosis virus
Papaya ringspot virus
Tomato yellow leaf curl virus
papayas
mixed infection
orchards
viruses
Aleyrodidae
signs and symptoms (plants)
Crinivirus
Begomovirus
Potyvirus
new host records
flavorings
Bemisia tabaci
fruit yield
fruit quality
disease control
sequence analysis
reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

A mixed infection of Lettuce chlorosis virus, papaya ringspot virus, and tomato yellow leaf curl virus-IL detected in a Texas papaya orchard affected by a virus-like disease outbreak. / Alabi, Olufemi J.; Al Rwahnih, M.; Jifon, J. L.; Sétamou, M.; Brown, J. K.; Gregg, L.; Park, J. W.

In: Plant Disease, Vol. 101, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 1094-1102.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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abstract = "Severe virus-like symptoms consisting of mosaic, distortion, yellowing, and brittleness were observed on papaya plants in a 20-ha orchard in South Texas during the 2014–15 growing season. Incidence of symptomatic plants increased from ∼40 to 100% within 6 months of the outbreak; the most severely affected plants were stunted, and fruit yield and quality were reduced compared with asymptomatic plants. The orchard papaya plant virome was explored using the Illumina NextSeq 500 platform and results were validated by Sanger DNA sequencing of complete viral genomes obtained by PCR amplification. The combined results revealed the presence of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV; Potyvirus), Lettuce chlorosis virus (LCV; Crinivirus), and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-IL (TYLCV-IL; Begomovirus). The RT-PCR analyses of leaves from 51 randomly sampled papaya plants indicated the presence of PRSV, LCV, and TYLCV-IL in 100, 39.2, and 15.7% of the samples, respectively. Plants infected with PRSV, in combination with LCV and/or TYLCV-IL, exhibited more severe symptoms compared with plants infected with PRSV alone. Furthermore, successful whitefly-mediated transmission of TYLCV-IL and LCV was accomplished by exposing virus-free papaya seedlings to viruliferous Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) under greenhouse conditions. The results of this study document a new host record for LCV and the first successful whitefly-mediated transmission of TYLCV-IL and LCV to papaya. As a perennial crop, infected papaya serving as an over-seasoning reservoir for TYLCV-IL and LCV, presents a new challenge to viral disease management in papaya orchards.",
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