A model of the cost-effectiveness of directly observed therapy for treatment of tuberculosis.

C. S. Palmer, B. Miller, Michael Halpern, L. J. Geiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A hypothetical cohort of 25,000 TB patients and their contacts were followed for a 10-year period; rates of treatment default, infectiousness following partial treatment, relapse, hospitalization, and development of drug-resistant TB were included. The average cost per case cured was $16,846 with 15% of patients starting DOT, $17,323 with 100% starting DOT, and $20,106 with none starting DOT. The incremental cost per additional case cured was $24,064 when all patients, started treatment on DOT, indicating that outpatient DOT provides a cost-effective method of improving health outcomes for TB patients and their contacts while controlling direct costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Public Health Management and Practice
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Directly Observed Therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Tuberculosis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics
Hospitalization
Outpatients
Recurrence
Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

Cite this

A model of the cost-effectiveness of directly observed therapy for treatment of tuberculosis. / Palmer, C. S.; Miller, B.; Halpern, Michael; Geiter, L. J.

In: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, Vol. 4, No. 3, 05.1998, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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