A multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing treatment of venous leg ulcers using mechanically versus electrically powered negative pressure wound therapy

William A. Marston, David G Armstrong, Alexander M. Reyzelman, Robert S. Kirsner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study compares two different negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) modalities in the treatment of venous leg ulcers (VLUs), the ultraportable mechanically powered (MP) Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP�) Wound Care System to the electrically powered (EP) Vacuum-Assisted Closure (V.A.C.�) System. Approach: Patients with VLUs from 13 centers participated in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Each subject was randomly assigned to treatment with either MP NPWT or EP NPWT and evaluated for 16 weeks or complete wound closure. Results: Forty patients (n=19 MP NPWT and n=21 EP NPWT) completed the study. Primary endpoint analysis of wound size reduction found wounds in the MP NPWT group had significantly greater wound size reduction than those in the EP NPWT group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks (p-value=0.0039, 0.0086, 0.0002, and 0.0005, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analyses showed greater acceleration in complete wound closure in the MP NPWT group. At 30 days, 50% wound closure was achieved in 52.6% (10/19) of patients treated with MP NPWT and 23.8% (5/21) of patients treated with EP NPWT. At 90 days, complete wound closure was achieved in 57.9% (11/19) of patients treated with MP NPWT and 38.15% (8/21) of patients treated with EP NPWT. Innovation: These data support the use of MP-NPWT for the treatment of VLUs. Conclusions: In this group of venous ulcers, wounds treated with MP NPWT demonstrated greater improvement and a higher likelihood of complete wound closure than those treated with EP NPWT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-82
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in Wound Care
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Varicose Ulcer
Leg Ulcer
Randomized Controlled Trials
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

A multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing treatment of venous leg ulcers using mechanically versus electrically powered negative pressure wound therapy. / Marston, William A.; Armstrong, David G; Reyzelman, Alexander M.; Kirsner, Robert S.

In: Advances in Wound Care, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 75-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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