A need for niches?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

175 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The idea that different species must have distinct ecologies if they are to coexist has been challenged recently by the claim that some models involving stochastic factors or clumped spatial distributions permit stable coexistence of species that are identical or differ only in competitive ability. However, these models have been misinterpreted; except in rather limited circumstances, they provide further support for the notion that species must be sufficiently ecologically distinct to coexist stably. The possible, limited, exceptions to this rule involve social factors by which individuals of a species discriminate between heterospecifics and conspecifics without there being any true ecological differences between species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-28
Number of pages3
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

niche
niches
spatial distribution
ecology
competitive ability
coexistence
need
social factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

A need for niches? / Chesson, Peter.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1991, p. 26-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chesson, Peter. / A need for niches?. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 1991 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 26-28.
@article{c56f0f43f1004647a1bc21b3be95cde4,
title = "A need for niches?",
abstract = "The idea that different species must have distinct ecologies if they are to coexist has been challenged recently by the claim that some models involving stochastic factors or clumped spatial distributions permit stable coexistence of species that are identical or differ only in competitive ability. However, these models have been misinterpreted; except in rather limited circumstances, they provide further support for the notion that species must be sufficiently ecologically distinct to coexist stably. The possible, limited, exceptions to this rule involve social factors by which individuals of a species discriminate between heterospecifics and conspecifics without there being any true ecological differences between species.",
author = "Peter Chesson",
year = "1991",
doi = "10.1016/0169-5347(91)90144-M",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "26--28",
journal = "Trends in Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "0169-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A need for niches?

AU - Chesson, Peter

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - The idea that different species must have distinct ecologies if they are to coexist has been challenged recently by the claim that some models involving stochastic factors or clumped spatial distributions permit stable coexistence of species that are identical or differ only in competitive ability. However, these models have been misinterpreted; except in rather limited circumstances, they provide further support for the notion that species must be sufficiently ecologically distinct to coexist stably. The possible, limited, exceptions to this rule involve social factors by which individuals of a species discriminate between heterospecifics and conspecifics without there being any true ecological differences between species.

AB - The idea that different species must have distinct ecologies if they are to coexist has been challenged recently by the claim that some models involving stochastic factors or clumped spatial distributions permit stable coexistence of species that are identical or differ only in competitive ability. However, these models have been misinterpreted; except in rather limited circumstances, they provide further support for the notion that species must be sufficiently ecologically distinct to coexist stably. The possible, limited, exceptions to this rule involve social factors by which individuals of a species discriminate between heterospecifics and conspecifics without there being any true ecological differences between species.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025954149&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025954149&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0169-5347(91)90144-M

DO - 10.1016/0169-5347(91)90144-M

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0025954149

VL - 6

SP - 26

EP - 28

JO - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

JF - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

SN - 0169-5347

IS - 1

ER -