A novel way of detecting transient cavitation near a solid surface during megasonic cleaning using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Megasonic energy assisted wet cleaning is traditionally used for removal of particulate contaminants from wafer and mask surfaces in semiconductor industry. One of the major issues associated with megasonic cleaning is the damage caused to fragile features due to transient cavitation. Development of a method to monitor transient cavitation events in solutions irradiated with sound energy will allow chemical formulators to fine tune the cleaning chemistry and acoustic field parameters for maximum cleaning efficiency without any feature damage. In this work, a method based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements on a microelectrode has been found to be effective in detection of transient cavity collapses in solutions subjected to ∼1 MHz sound field. Additionally, the technique also provides useful information about the diffusion boundary layer thicknesses in the presence and absence of megasonic field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-15
Number of pages5
JournalMicroelectronic Engineering
Volume108
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

cavitation flow
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Cavitation
solid surfaces
cleaning
Cleaning
impedance
Acoustic fields
spectroscopy
damage
boundary layer thickness
acoustics
Microelectrodes
sound fields
particulates
contaminants
Masks
Boundary layers
masks
industries

Keywords

  • Acoustic streaming
  • Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)
  • Megasonic cleaning
  • Microelectrode
  • Transient cavitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

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abstract = "Megasonic energy assisted wet cleaning is traditionally used for removal of particulate contaminants from wafer and mask surfaces in semiconductor industry. One of the major issues associated with megasonic cleaning is the damage caused to fragile features due to transient cavitation. Development of a method to monitor transient cavitation events in solutions irradiated with sound energy will allow chemical formulators to fine tune the cleaning chemistry and acoustic field parameters for maximum cleaning efficiency without any feature damage. In this work, a method based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements on a microelectrode has been found to be effective in detection of transient cavity collapses in solutions subjected to ∼1 MHz sound field. Additionally, the technique also provides useful information about the diffusion boundary layer thicknesses in the presence and absence of megasonic field.",
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author = "Keswani, {Manish K} and Srini Raghavan and Deymier, {Pierre A}",
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AU - Keswani, Manish K

AU - Raghavan, Srini

AU - Deymier, Pierre A

PY - 2013

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N2 - Megasonic energy assisted wet cleaning is traditionally used for removal of particulate contaminants from wafer and mask surfaces in semiconductor industry. One of the major issues associated with megasonic cleaning is the damage caused to fragile features due to transient cavitation. Development of a method to monitor transient cavitation events in solutions irradiated with sound energy will allow chemical formulators to fine tune the cleaning chemistry and acoustic field parameters for maximum cleaning efficiency without any feature damage. In this work, a method based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements on a microelectrode has been found to be effective in detection of transient cavity collapses in solutions subjected to ∼1 MHz sound field. Additionally, the technique also provides useful information about the diffusion boundary layer thicknesses in the presence and absence of megasonic field.

AB - Megasonic energy assisted wet cleaning is traditionally used for removal of particulate contaminants from wafer and mask surfaces in semiconductor industry. One of the major issues associated with megasonic cleaning is the damage caused to fragile features due to transient cavitation. Development of a method to monitor transient cavitation events in solutions irradiated with sound energy will allow chemical formulators to fine tune the cleaning chemistry and acoustic field parameters for maximum cleaning efficiency without any feature damage. In this work, a method based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements on a microelectrode has been found to be effective in detection of transient cavity collapses in solutions subjected to ∼1 MHz sound field. Additionally, the technique also provides useful information about the diffusion boundary layer thicknesses in the presence and absence of megasonic field.

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