A pilot study of big brothers big sisters programs and youth development: An application of critical race theory

Hyejoon Park, Jina Yoon, Shantel D. Crosby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Testing critical race theory, we examined whether children and adolescents with an adult mentor of the same race/ethnicity display higher levels of confidence, competence, and caring than those with a mentor of a different race/ethnicity. We also tested whether longer participation in the mentoring program results in better developmental outcomes. The sample included 47 cross- and same-race mentor-mentee pairs in the Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) program. Developmental outcomes were measured using Big Brothers Big Sisters of America's (BBBSA) Program-based Outcome Evaluation, and were analyzed using t-test, chi-square, and General Lineal Model. No significant differences were found in youth development based on racial/ethnic match. However, the longer matched pairs showed greater competence. Implications for practice, policies, and research are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-89
Number of pages7
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume61
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • Big Brothers Big Sisters
  • Critical race theory
  • Match length
  • Mentoring program
  • Race/ethnicity match
  • Youth development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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