A pilot study of diethyldithiocarbamate in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the AIDS-related complex

Gary W. Brewton, Evan M. Hersh, Adan Rios, Peter W.A. Mansell, Blaine Hollinger, James M. Reuben

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated the use of diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC, or Imuthiolr, Merieux Institute) as a therapeutic agent in patients with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-Related Complex (ARC). Patients were prospectively stratified and randomized to receive DTC 200mg/m2 intravenously weekly for 16 weeks or no therapy, followed by crossover to the opposite arm for an equal period. Forty-four patients were entered and forty were evaluable. There was a statistically significant decrease in symptoms in the DTC treated patients compared to the controls (p=.002). There was a significant improvement in lymphadenopathy in the treated patients compared to the controls (p=.005). One patient showed disappearance of splenomegaly, one clearing of antifungal agent-resistant perianal moniliasis, and one clearing of hairy leukoplakia. No significant differences in progression were noted. No changes were seen in any of the immunological parameters measured. There was no significant toxicity. Because of the changes in symptoms and in lymphadenopathy, we suggest that further study of DTC, both alone and in combination with other agents, may be indicated.1 1 The study was approved by an institutional review board (human subjects committee), and that written, informed consent was obtained from the patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2509-2520
Number of pages12
JournalLife Sciences
Volume45
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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