A recent common ancestry for human Y chromosomes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

THE male-specific portion of the Y chromosome is especially useful for studies of human origins. Patterns of nucleotide variation that are neutral with respect to fitness should permit estimates of when and where ancestral Y chromosomes existed1. However, variation on the human Y chromosome has been observed to be greatly reduced relative to the autosomes and the X chromosome2-5. One explanation is that selection for a favourable mutation on the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome has resulted in the recent fixation of a single Y haplotype5,6. A 2.6-kiIobase fragment encompassing a polymorphic Alu insertion was sequenced from 16 human and four chimpanzee Y chromosomes. Patterns of nucleotide sequence diversity and divergence provide no evidence for a recent, strong selective sweep on the human Y chromosome. The time back to a common ancestral human Y chromosome is estimated to be 188,000 years, with a 95% confidence interval from 51,000 to 411,000 years. These results are consistent with auto-somal and mitochondrial DNA studies that suggest a long-term human effective population size of 10,000 and a sex ratio of 1 (ref. 7). These inferences contradict predictions of the multiregional hypothesis8 positing a widespread transformation of Homo erectus populations into Homo sapiens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-378
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume378
Issue number6555
StatePublished - 1995

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Chromosomes, Human, Y
Y Chromosome
Pan troglodytes
Sex Ratio
Hominidae
Population Density
Mitochondrial DNA
Nucleotides
Confidence Intervals
Mutation
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

A recent common ancestry for human Y chromosomes. / Hammer, Michael F.

In: Nature, Vol. 378, No. 6555, 1995, p. 376-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hammer, MF 1995, 'A recent common ancestry for human Y chromosomes', Nature, vol. 378, no. 6555, pp. 376-378.
Hammer, Michael F. / A recent common ancestry for human Y chromosomes. In: Nature. 1995 ; Vol. 378, No. 6555. pp. 376-378.
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