A record of planet migration in the main asteroid belt

David A. Minton, Renu Malhotra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The main asteroid belt lies between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, but the region is not uniformly filled with asteroids. There are gaps, known as the Kirkwood gaps, in distinct locations that are associated with orbital resonances with the giant planets; asteroids placed in these locations will follow chaotic orbits and be removed. Here we show that the observed distribution of main belt asteroids does not fill uniformly even those regions that are dynamically stable over the age of the Solar System. We find a pattern of excess depletion of asteroids, particularly just outward of the Kirkwood gaps associated with the 5:2, the 7:3 and the 2:1 Jovian resonances. These features are not accounted for by planetary perturbations in the current structure of the Solar System, but are consistent with dynamical ejection of asteroids by the sweeping of gravitational resonances during the migration of Jupiter and Saturn ∼4 Gyr ago.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1109-1111
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume457
Issue number7233
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 26 2009

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Minor Planets
Planets
Orbit
Solar System
Saturn
Mars

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A record of planet migration in the main asteroid belt. / Minton, David A.; Malhotra, Renu.

In: Nature, Vol. 457, No. 7233, 26.02.2009, p. 1109-1111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Minton, David A. ; Malhotra, Renu. / A record of planet migration in the main asteroid belt. In: Nature. 2009 ; Vol. 457, No. 7233. pp. 1109-1111.
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