A retrospective study on improvements in nightmares and post-traumatic stress disorder following treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing

Barry Krakow, Carmen Lowry, Anne Germain, Lane Gaddy, Michael Hollifield, Mary P Koss, Dan Tandberg, Lisa Johnston, Dominic Melendrez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

111 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the impact of treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) on patients with nightmares and post-traumatic stress. Methods: Twenty-three chronic nightmare sufferers (15 with post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD) who also suffered co-morbid SDB (obstructive sleep apnea, OSA, n = 16; upper airway resistance syndrome, UARS, n = 7) completed a telephone interview, on average, 21 months after having been offered treatment for SDB at a university sleep disorders clinic. Results: At follow-up, 14 reported maintaining treatment (Treatment Group) and 9 reported discontinuing treatment (No-Treatment Group). More patients in the Treatment Group reported improvement in sleep (93% vs. 33%) and in daytime well being (93% vs. 33%) compared with those in the No-Treatment group. The Treatment Group reported a median improvement in nightmares of 85% compared with a median 10% worsening in the No-Treatment Group. In the PTSD subset (n = 15), nine in the Treatment Group reported a median 75% improvement in PTSD symptoms whereas six in the No-Treatment Group reported a median 43% worsening. Conclusion: In this small sample of patients, treatment of SDB was associated with improvements in nightmares and PTSD. Relationships between nightmares, PTSD and SDB are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-298
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Retrospective Studies
Therapeutics
Airway Resistance
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Sleep

Keywords

  • Nightmares
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • PTSD
  • Upper airway resistance syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

A retrospective study on improvements in nightmares and post-traumatic stress disorder following treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing. / Krakow, Barry; Lowry, Carmen; Germain, Anne; Gaddy, Lane; Hollifield, Michael; Koss, Mary P; Tandberg, Dan; Johnston, Lisa; Melendrez, Dominic.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Vol. 49, No. 5, 2000, p. 291-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krakow, Barry ; Lowry, Carmen ; Germain, Anne ; Gaddy, Lane ; Hollifield, Michael ; Koss, Mary P ; Tandberg, Dan ; Johnston, Lisa ; Melendrez, Dominic. / A retrospective study on improvements in nightmares and post-traumatic stress disorder following treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing. In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 2000 ; Vol. 49, No. 5. pp. 291-298.
@article{86c940e6369644daa1c7ad94a71fb585,
title = "A retrospective study on improvements in nightmares and post-traumatic stress disorder following treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing",
abstract = "Objective: To assess the impact of treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) on patients with nightmares and post-traumatic stress. Methods: Twenty-three chronic nightmare sufferers (15 with post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD) who also suffered co-morbid SDB (obstructive sleep apnea, OSA, n = 16; upper airway resistance syndrome, UARS, n = 7) completed a telephone interview, on average, 21 months after having been offered treatment for SDB at a university sleep disorders clinic. Results: At follow-up, 14 reported maintaining treatment (Treatment Group) and 9 reported discontinuing treatment (No-Treatment Group). More patients in the Treatment Group reported improvement in sleep (93{\%} vs. 33{\%}) and in daytime well being (93{\%} vs. 33{\%}) compared with those in the No-Treatment group. The Treatment Group reported a median improvement in nightmares of 85{\%} compared with a median 10{\%} worsening in the No-Treatment Group. In the PTSD subset (n = 15), nine in the Treatment Group reported a median 75{\%} improvement in PTSD symptoms whereas six in the No-Treatment Group reported a median 43{\%} worsening. Conclusion: In this small sample of patients, treatment of SDB was associated with improvements in nightmares and PTSD. Relationships between nightmares, PTSD and SDB are discussed.",
keywords = "Nightmares, Obstructive sleep apnea, PTSD, Upper airway resistance syndrome",
author = "Barry Krakow and Carmen Lowry and Anne Germain and Lane Gaddy and Michael Hollifield and Koss, {Mary P} and Dan Tandberg and Lisa Johnston and Dominic Melendrez",
year = "2000",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-3999(00)00147-1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "291--298",
journal = "Journal of Psychosomatic Research",
issn = "0022-3999",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A retrospective study on improvements in nightmares and post-traumatic stress disorder following treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing

AU - Krakow, Barry

AU - Lowry, Carmen

AU - Germain, Anne

AU - Gaddy, Lane

AU - Hollifield, Michael

AU - Koss, Mary P

AU - Tandberg, Dan

AU - Johnston, Lisa

AU - Melendrez, Dominic

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Objective: To assess the impact of treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) on patients with nightmares and post-traumatic stress. Methods: Twenty-three chronic nightmare sufferers (15 with post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD) who also suffered co-morbid SDB (obstructive sleep apnea, OSA, n = 16; upper airway resistance syndrome, UARS, n = 7) completed a telephone interview, on average, 21 months after having been offered treatment for SDB at a university sleep disorders clinic. Results: At follow-up, 14 reported maintaining treatment (Treatment Group) and 9 reported discontinuing treatment (No-Treatment Group). More patients in the Treatment Group reported improvement in sleep (93% vs. 33%) and in daytime well being (93% vs. 33%) compared with those in the No-Treatment group. The Treatment Group reported a median improvement in nightmares of 85% compared with a median 10% worsening in the No-Treatment Group. In the PTSD subset (n = 15), nine in the Treatment Group reported a median 75% improvement in PTSD symptoms whereas six in the No-Treatment Group reported a median 43% worsening. Conclusion: In this small sample of patients, treatment of SDB was associated with improvements in nightmares and PTSD. Relationships between nightmares, PTSD and SDB are discussed.

AB - Objective: To assess the impact of treatment for co-morbid sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) on patients with nightmares and post-traumatic stress. Methods: Twenty-three chronic nightmare sufferers (15 with post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD) who also suffered co-morbid SDB (obstructive sleep apnea, OSA, n = 16; upper airway resistance syndrome, UARS, n = 7) completed a telephone interview, on average, 21 months after having been offered treatment for SDB at a university sleep disorders clinic. Results: At follow-up, 14 reported maintaining treatment (Treatment Group) and 9 reported discontinuing treatment (No-Treatment Group). More patients in the Treatment Group reported improvement in sleep (93% vs. 33%) and in daytime well being (93% vs. 33%) compared with those in the No-Treatment group. The Treatment Group reported a median improvement in nightmares of 85% compared with a median 10% worsening in the No-Treatment Group. In the PTSD subset (n = 15), nine in the Treatment Group reported a median 75% improvement in PTSD symptoms whereas six in the No-Treatment Group reported a median 43% worsening. Conclusion: In this small sample of patients, treatment of SDB was associated with improvements in nightmares and PTSD. Relationships between nightmares, PTSD and SDB are discussed.

KW - Nightmares

KW - Obstructive sleep apnea

KW - PTSD

KW - Upper airway resistance syndrome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034494017&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034494017&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-3999(00)00147-1

DO - 10.1016/S0022-3999(00)00147-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 11164053

AN - SCOPUS:0034494017

VL - 49

SP - 291

EP - 298

JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

SN - 0022-3999

IS - 5

ER -