A safe autonomous vehicle trajectory domain specific modeling language for non-expert development

Matt Bunting, Yegeta Zeleke, Kennon McKeever, Jonathan Sprinkle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Managing complexity while ensuring safely designed behaviors is important for cyber-physical systems as they are continually introduced to consumers, such as autonomous vehicles. Safety considerations are important as programming interfaces become open to experts and non experts of varying degrees. Autonomous vehicles are an example system where many domain experts must collaborate together to ensure safe operation. Through the use of higher level abstraction, domain experts may provide verification tools to check dynamic behavioral constraints. Similarly, higher level modeling tools may generate lower level artifacts for a working system. With modeling and verification tools, smaller teams and potentially non-experts may program custom behaviors while ensuring a correctly behaved system. A high level domain specific modeling language was created with a focus on non-domain experts. The domain consists of driving a vehicle through a set of known waypoints by connecting together multiple primitive motions in a sequence. Though constrained to simple motions, it is still possible to create a sequence to drive the vehicle unsafely. Model verification was implemented to check that the expected start and stop waypoints were correctly reached without driving the vehicle into unsafe regions. The language was then provided to a set of 4th year elementary school students to create unique paths. The models created by the students were then used to generate controller artifacts to operate a real autonomous vehicle on a soccer field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDSM 2016 - Proceedings of the International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, co-located with SPLASH 2016
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages42-48
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781450348942
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 30 2016
Event16th International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, DSM 2016 - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: Oct 30 2016 → …

Other

Other16th International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, DSM 2016
CountryNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period10/30/16 → …

Fingerprint

Domain-specific Languages
Autonomous Vehicles
Modeling Language
Trajectories
Trajectory
Model Verification
Motion
Students
Modeling
Programming
Safety
Modeling languages
Controller
Path
Controllers

Keywords

  • Cyber Physical Systems
  • Domain Specific Modeling
  • Metamodeling
  • Model Verification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Software
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Bunting, M., Zeleke, Y., McKeever, K., & Sprinkle, J. (2016). A safe autonomous vehicle trajectory domain specific modeling language for non-expert development. In DSM 2016 - Proceedings of the International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, co-located with SPLASH 2016 (pp. 42-48). [3023154] Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/3023147.3023154

A safe autonomous vehicle trajectory domain specific modeling language for non-expert development. / Bunting, Matt; Zeleke, Yegeta; McKeever, Kennon; Sprinkle, Jonathan.

DSM 2016 - Proceedings of the International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, co-located with SPLASH 2016. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2016. p. 42-48 3023154.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bunting, M, Zeleke, Y, McKeever, K & Sprinkle, J 2016, A safe autonomous vehicle trajectory domain specific modeling language for non-expert development. in DSM 2016 - Proceedings of the International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, co-located with SPLASH 2016., 3023154, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 42-48, 16th International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, DSM 2016, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 10/30/16. https://doi.org/10.1145/3023147.3023154
Bunting M, Zeleke Y, McKeever K, Sprinkle J. A safe autonomous vehicle trajectory domain specific modeling language for non-expert development. In DSM 2016 - Proceedings of the International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, co-located with SPLASH 2016. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2016. p. 42-48. 3023154 https://doi.org/10.1145/3023147.3023154
Bunting, Matt ; Zeleke, Yegeta ; McKeever, Kennon ; Sprinkle, Jonathan. / A safe autonomous vehicle trajectory domain specific modeling language for non-expert development. DSM 2016 - Proceedings of the International Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, co-located with SPLASH 2016. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2016. pp. 42-48
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