A scoping review of the quality and the design of evaluations of mobile health, telehealth, smart pump and monitoring technologies performed in a pharmacy-related setting

Darrin Baines, Imandeep K. Gahir, Afthab Hussain, Amir J. Khan, Philip Schneider, Syed S. Hasan, Zaheer Ud Din Babar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is currently a need for high quality evaluations of new mobile health, telehealth, smart pump and monitoring technologies undertaken in a pharmacy-related setting. We aim to evaluate the use of these monitoring technologies performed in this setting. Methods: A systematic searching of English articles that examined the quality and the design of technologies conducted in pharmacy-related facilities was performed using the following databases: MEDLINE and Cumulative index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) to identify original studies examining the quality and the design of technologies and published in peer-reviewed journals. Extraction of articles and quality assessment of included articles were performed independently by two authors. Quality scores over 75% are classed as being acceptable using a "relatively conservative" quality benchmark. Scores over 55% are included using a "relatively liberal" cut-offpoint. Results: Screening resulted in the selection of 40 formal evaluations. A substantial number of studies (32, 80.00%) were performed in the United States, quantitative in approach (33, 82.50%) and retrospective cohort (24, 60.00%) in study design. The most common pharmacy-related settings were: 22 primary care (55.00%); 10 hospital pharmacy (25.00%); 7 community pharmacy (17.50%); one primary care and hospital pharmacy (2.50%). The majority of the evaluations (33, 82.50%) reported clinical outcomes, six (15.00%) measured clinical and economic outcomes, and one (2.50%) economic only. Twelve (30.00%) quantitative studies and no qualitative study met objective criteria for "relatively conservative" quality. Using a lower "relatively liberal" benchmark, 27 quantitative (81.82%) and four qualitative (57.41%) studies met the lower quality criterion. Conclusion: Worldwide, few evaluations of mobile health, telehealth, smart pump and monitoring technologies in pharmacy-related setting have been published. Their quality is often below the standard necessary for inclusion in a systematic review mainly due to inadequate study design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number678
JournalFrontiers in Pharmacology
Volume9
Issue numberJUL
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 26 2018

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Keywords

  • Mobile health
  • Monitoring technologies
  • Pharmaceutical care
  • Pharmacy
  • Smart pumps
  • Telehealth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

A scoping review of the quality and the design of evaluations of mobile health, telehealth, smart pump and monitoring technologies performed in a pharmacy-related setting. / Baines, Darrin; Gahir, Imandeep K.; Hussain, Afthab; Khan, Amir J.; Schneider, Philip; Hasan, Syed S.; Babar, Zaheer Ud Din.

In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, Vol. 9, No. JUL, 678, 26.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Baines, Darrin ; Gahir, Imandeep K. ; Hussain, Afthab ; Khan, Amir J. ; Schneider, Philip ; Hasan, Syed S. ; Babar, Zaheer Ud Din. / A scoping review of the quality and the design of evaluations of mobile health, telehealth, smart pump and monitoring technologies performed in a pharmacy-related setting. In: Frontiers in Pharmacology. 2018 ; Vol. 9, No. JUL.
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AU - Khan, Amir J.

AU - Schneider, Philip

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AU - Babar, Zaheer Ud Din

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