A sublimation model for Martian south polar ice features

Shane Byrne, Andrew P. Ingersoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In their pioneering work, Leighton and Murray argued that the Mars atmosphere, which at present is 95% carbon dioxide, is controlled by vapor equilibrium with a much larger polar reservoir of solid carbon dioxide. Here we argue that the polar reservoir is small and cannot function as a long-term buffer to the more massive atmosphere. Our work is based on modeling of the circular depressions commonly found on the south polar cap. We argue that a carbon dioxide ice layer about 8 meters thick is being etched away to reveal water ice underneath. This is consistent with thermal infrared data from the Mars Odyssey mission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1051-1053
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume299
Issue number5609
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 14 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Sublimation
Ice
Carbon Dioxide
Mars
Atmosphere
Buffers
Hot Temperature
Depression
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

A sublimation model for Martian south polar ice features. / Byrne, Shane; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

In: Science, Vol. 299, No. 5609, 14.02.2003, p. 1051-1053.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Byrne, Shane ; Ingersoll, Andrew P. / A sublimation model for Martian south polar ice features. In: Science. 2003 ; Vol. 299, No. 5609. pp. 1051-1053.
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