A Systematic Review of Behavioral Interventions to Promote Intake of Fruit and Vegetables

Cynthia Thomson, Jennifer Ravia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fruit and vegetable (F/V) intake in the United States remains below recommended levels despite evidence of the health benefits of regular consumption. Efforts to increase F/V intake include behavior-based interventions. A systematic review of MEDLINE PubMed and PsycINFO databases (2005-2010) was conducted to identify behavior-based intervention trials designed to promote F/V intake. Using predetermined limits and selection criteria, 34 studies were identified for inclusion. Behavior-based interventions resulted in an average increase in F/V intake of +1.13 and +0.39 servings per day in adults and children, respectively. Interventions involving minority adults or low-income participants demonstrated average increases in daily F/V consumption of +0.97 servings/day, whereas worksite interventions averaged +0.8 servings/day. Achieving and sustaining F/V intake at recommended levels of intake across the population cannot be achieved through behavior-based interventions alone. Thus, efforts to combine these interventions with other approaches including social marketing, behavioral economics approaches, and technology-based behavior change models should be tested to ensure goals are met and sustained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1523-1535
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume111
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

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vegetable consumption
systematic review
fruit consumption
Vegetables
Fruit
Behavioral Economics
social marketing
Social Marketing
Insurance Benefits
behavior change
selection criteria
PubMed
MEDLINE
Workplace
Patient Selection
income
Databases
Technology
economics
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

A Systematic Review of Behavioral Interventions to Promote Intake of Fruit and Vegetables. / Thomson, Cynthia; Ravia, Jennifer.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 111, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 1523-1535.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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