A terror management perspective on ageism

Andy Martens, Jamie L. Goldenberg, Jeff L Greenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present article, we present a theoretical perspective on ageism that is derived from terror management theory. According to the theory, human beings manage deeply-rooted fears about their vulnerability to death through symbolic constructions of meaning and corresponding standards of value. We extend this perspective to suggest that elderly individuals present an existential threat for the non-elderly because they remind us all that: (a) death is inescapable, (b) the body is fallible, and (c) the bases by which we may secure self-esteem (and manage death anxiety) are transitory. We review some recent empirical evidence in support of these ideas and then discuss possible avenues for combating ageism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-239
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Social Issues
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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terrorism
death
management
anxiety
self-esteem
vulnerability
threat
human being
evidence
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A terror management perspective on ageism. / Martens, Andy; Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Greenberg, Jeff L.

In: Journal of Social Issues, Vol. 61, No. 2, 2005, p. 223-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martens, Andy ; Goldenberg, Jamie L. ; Greenberg, Jeff L. / A terror management perspective on ageism. In: Journal of Social Issues. 2005 ; Vol. 61, No. 2. pp. 223-239.
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