A Test of The Risk Perception Attitude Framework as a Message Tailoring Strategy to Promote Diabetes Screening

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Abstract

The risk perception attitude (RPA) framework was tested as a message tailoring strategy to encourage diabetes screening. Participants (N = 602) were first categorized into one of four RPA groups based on their diabetes risk and efficacy perceptions and then randomly assigned to receive a message that matched their RPA, mismatched their RPA, or a control message. Participants receiving a matched message reported greater intentions to engage in self-protective behavior than participants who received a mismatched message or the control message. The results also showed differences in attitudes and behavioral intentions across the four RPA groups. Participants in the responsive group had more positive attitudes toward diabetes screening than the other three groups, whereas participants in the indifferent group reported the weakest intentions to engage in self-protective behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-679
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Communication
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 12 2019

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Risk perception
Medical problems
chronic illness
Screening
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

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abstract = "The risk perception attitude (RPA) framework was tested as a message tailoring strategy to encourage diabetes screening. Participants (N = 602) were first categorized into one of four RPA groups based on their diabetes risk and efficacy perceptions and then randomly assigned to receive a message that matched their RPA, mismatched their RPA, or a control message. Participants receiving a matched message reported greater intentions to engage in self-protective behavior than participants who received a mismatched message or the control message. The results also showed differences in attitudes and behavioral intentions across the four RPA groups. Participants in the responsive group had more positive attitudes toward diabetes screening than the other three groups, whereas participants in the indifferent group reported the weakest intentions to engage in self-protective behavior.",
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