A trans-national monarch butterfly population model and implications for regional conservation priorities

Karen Oberhauser, Ruscena Wiederholt, Jay E. Diffendorfer, Darius Semmens, Leslie Ries, Wayne E. Thogmartin, Laura Lopez-Hoffman, Brice Semmens

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 8 Citations

Abstract

1. The monarch has undergone considerable population declines over the past decade, and the governments of Mexico, Canada, and the United States have agreed to work together to conserve the species. 2. Given limited resources, understanding where to focus conservation action is key for widespread species like monarchs. To support planning for continental-scale monarch habitat restoration, we address the question of where restoration efforts are likely to have the largest impacts on monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus Linn.) population growth rates. 3. We present a spatially explicit demographic model simulating the multi-generational annual cycle of the eastern monarch population, and use the model to examine management scenarios, some of which focus on particular regions of North America. 4. Improving the monarch habitat in the north central or southern parts of the monarch range yields a slightly greater increase in the population growth rate than restoration in other regions. However, combining restoration efforts across multiple regions yields population growth rates above 1 with smaller simulated improvements in habitat per region than single-region strategies. 5. Synthesis and applications: These findings suggest that conservation investment in projects across the full monarch range will be more effective than focusing on one or a few regions, and will require international cooperation across many land use categories.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages51-60
Number of pages10
JournalEcological Entomology
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Danaus plexippus
population growth
butterfly
habitats
restoration
international cooperation
habitat conservation
demographic statistics
planning
land use
Mexico
Canada
synthesis
habitat
habitat restoration
population decline
annual cycle
resource
North America
project

Keywords

  • Bayesian stage-based matrix model
  • conservation prioritisation
  • Danaus plexippus
  • management strategies
  • population dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Oberhauser, K., Wiederholt, R., Diffendorfer, J. E., Semmens, D., Ries, L., Thogmartin, W. E., ... Semmens, B. (2017). A trans-national monarch butterfly population model and implications for regional conservation priorities. Ecological Entomology, 42(1), 51-60. DOI: 10.1111/een.12351

A trans-national monarch butterfly population model and implications for regional conservation priorities. / Oberhauser, Karen; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Semmens, Darius; Ries, Leslie; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Lopez-Hoffman, Laura; Semmens, Brice.

In: Ecological Entomology, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 51-60.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Oberhauser, K, Wiederholt, R, Diffendorfer, JE, Semmens, D, Ries, L, Thogmartin, WE, Lopez-Hoffman, L & Semmens, B 2017, 'A trans-national monarch butterfly population model and implications for regional conservation priorities' Ecological Entomology, vol 42, no. 1, pp. 51-60. DOI: 10.1111/een.12351
Oberhauser K, Wiederholt R, Diffendorfer JE, Semmens D, Ries L, Thogmartin WE et al. A trans-national monarch butterfly population model and implications for regional conservation priorities. Ecological Entomology. 2017 Feb 1;42(1):51-60. Available from, DOI: 10.1111/een.12351
Oberhauser, Karen ; Wiederholt, Ruscena ; Diffendorfer, Jay E. ; Semmens, Darius ; Ries, Leslie ; Thogmartin, Wayne E. ; Lopez-Hoffman, Laura ; Semmens, Brice. / A trans-national monarch butterfly population model and implications for regional conservation priorities. In: Ecological Entomology. 2017 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 51-60
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