A trend between cold debris disk temperature and stellar type: Implications for the formation and evolution of wide-orbit planets

Nicholas P. Ballering, George H. Rieke, Kate Y.L. Su, Edward Montiel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cold debris disks have the potential to answer many outstanding questions in wide-orbit planet formation and evolution. We characterized the infrared excess SEDs of 174 cold debris disks with Spitzer IRS and MIPS. We found a trend between the temperature of the disks and the stellar type of the stars they orbit. This argues against the importance of strictly temperature-dependent processes (e.g. ice lines) in setting the dimensions of cold debris disks. We also found no evidence that delayed stirring causes the trend. The trend may result from outward planet migration that traces the extent of the primordial protoplanetary disk, or from planet formation that halts at an orbital radius limited by the efficiency of core accretion. For the full details of this work, see Ballering et al. (2013).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationExploring the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages326-327
Number of pages2
EditionS299
ISBN (Print)9781107045200
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the International Astronomical Union
NumberS299
Volume8
ISSN (Print)1743-9213
ISSN (Electronic)1743-9221

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Keywords

  • Circumstellar matter
  • Infrared: stars
  • Interplanetary medium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Ballering, N. P., Rieke, G. H., Su, K. Y. L., & Montiel, E. (2013). A trend between cold debris disk temperature and stellar type: Implications for the formation and evolution of wide-orbit planets. In Exploring the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (S299 ed., pp. 326-327). (Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union; Vol. 8, No. S299). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1743921313008788