Academic success in rural America: Family background and community integration

Stephen T Russell, Glen H. Elder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Communities of farm families share unique support and resources; does community integration promote children's academic success, even in a rural region suffering a depressed agricultural economy? This study examines the academic success of children from farm and non-farm families in the rural Midwest of the United States. Children from farm families show the highest levels of academic performance, owing largely to the high levels of parental involvement and leadership in the local community. Parents who farm part-time have less time to be active in the community; nevertheless, their children retain the benefits of the community ties that were developed when the family farmed full-time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-181
Number of pages13
JournalChildhood
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Community Integration
academic success
farm
community
part-time farm
Parents
rural area
parents
agriculture
Farms
leadership
resources
performance

Keywords

  • Academics
  • Civic involvement
  • Parenting
  • Rural ecology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Academic success in rural America : Family background and community integration. / Russell, Stephen T; Elder, Glen H.

In: Childhood, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1997, p. 169-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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