Activated membrane patches guide chemotactic cell motility

Inbal Hecht, Monica L. Skoge, Pascale G Charest, Eshel Ben-Jacob, Richard A. Firtel, William F. Loomis, Herbert Levine, Wouter Jan Rappel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many eukaryotic cells are able to crawl on surfaces and guide their motility based on environmental cues. These cues are interpreted by signaling systems which couple to cell mechanics; indeed membrane protrusions in crawling cells are often accompanied by activated membrane patches, which are localized areas of increased concentration of one or more signaling components. To determine how these patches are related to cell motion, we examine the spatial localization of RasGTP in chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells under conditions where the vertical extent of the cell was restricted. Quantitative analyses of the data reveal a high degree of spatial correlation between patches of activated Ras and membrane protrusions. Based on these findings, we formulate a model for amoeboid cell motion that consists of two coupled modules. The first module utilizes a recently developed two-component reaction diffusion model that generates transient and localized areas of elevated concentration of one of the components along the membrane. The activated patches determine the location of membrane protrusions (and overall cell motion) that are computed in the second module, which also takes into account the cortical tension and the availability of protrusion resources. We show that our model is able to produce realistic amoeboid-like motion and that our numerical results are consistent with experimentally observed pseudopod dynamics. Specifically, we show that the commonly observed splitting of pseudopods can result directly from the dynamics of the signaling patches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1002044
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cell Motility
motility
cell movement
Cell Movement
Patch
Membrane
membrane
Membranes
Cell
Pseudopodia
pseudopodia
cells
Cues
Motion
Cell Surface Extensions
environmental cue
Module
Dictyostelium
Dictyostelium discoideum
mechanics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Ecology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Hecht, I., Skoge, M. L., Charest, P. G., Ben-Jacob, E., Firtel, R. A., Loomis, W. F., ... Rappel, W. J. (2011). Activated membrane patches guide chemotactic cell motility. PLoS Computational Biology, 7(6), [e1002044]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002044

Activated membrane patches guide chemotactic cell motility. / Hecht, Inbal; Skoge, Monica L.; Charest, Pascale G; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Firtel, Richard A.; Loomis, William F.; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter Jan.

In: PLoS Computational Biology, Vol. 7, No. 6, e1002044, 06.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hecht, I, Skoge, ML, Charest, PG, Ben-Jacob, E, Firtel, RA, Loomis, WF, Levine, H & Rappel, WJ 2011, 'Activated membrane patches guide chemotactic cell motility', PLoS Computational Biology, vol. 7, no. 6, e1002044. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002044
Hecht, Inbal ; Skoge, Monica L. ; Charest, Pascale G ; Ben-Jacob, Eshel ; Firtel, Richard A. ; Loomis, William F. ; Levine, Herbert ; Rappel, Wouter Jan. / Activated membrane patches guide chemotactic cell motility. In: PLoS Computational Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 7, No. 6.
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