Active compression-decompression versus standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model: No improvement in outcome

Karl B Kern, Gary Figge, Ronald W. Hilwig, Arthur B Sanders, Robert A. Berg, Charles W Otto, Gordon A. Ewy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a new innovative basic life-support technique during which the anterior cheat wall is actively decompressed by a suction device. CPR techniques were studied in 36 swine to test the hypothesis that active compression- decompression CPR improves coronary perfusion pressure, myocardial blood flow during CPR, and 24-hour survival. After 30 seconds of untreated ventricular fibrillation, CPR was begun and continued for 12.5 minutes by one of the three following methods: (1) active compression-decompression CPR with a auction device modified to include a precision force transducer; (2) standard CPR performed with a force transducer device; and (3) standard manual CPR performed without a force transducer device. CPR-generated coronary perfusion pressure, myocardial blood flow, and the force of compression were measured at 3 and 10 minutes of resuscitation effort. Initial return of spontaneous circulation, 24-hour survival, and trauma scores were also evaluated. Active compression-decompression CPR produced consistently better results than did standard CPR performed with a force transducer, but not better than standard CPR performed manually without a force transducer. The use of a force- measuring device with standard CPR may compromise hemodynamic response and outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1156-1162
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume132
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Decompression
Swine
Transducers
Equipment and Supplies
Perfusion
Blood Pressure
Suction
Ventricular Fibrillation
Resuscitation
Hemodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Active compression-decompression versus standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model : No improvement in outcome. / Kern, Karl B; Figge, Gary; Hilwig, Ronald W.; Sanders, Arthur B; Berg, Robert A.; Otto, Charles W; Ewy, Gordon A.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 132, No. 6, 1996, p. 1156-1162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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