Acute cardiovascular responses to a single bout of high intensity inspiratory muscle strength training in healthy young adults

Claire M. DeLucia, Dean R. DeBonis, Sarah M. Schwyhart, E. Fiona Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

High intensity, low volume inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) has favorable effects on casual systolic blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance. However, the acute effects of IMST on heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and sympathetic regulation of vascular resistance and the trajectory of post exercise recovery are not known. We recruited 14 young adults (7 women/7 men, age: 22 ± 2 years) to perform a single bout of high intensity IMST (inspiratory resistance set at 75% of maximal inspiratory pressure) importantly, female and male subjects were matched in regard to the target inspiratory pressure and target inspiratory muscle work per breath. We recorded HR, beat-to-beat changes in BP and postganglionic, muscle sympathetic nerve activities (MSNA) continuously throughout baseline, a single bout of IMST (comprising five sets of 6 inspiratory efforts) and in recovery. We show that one bout of IMST does not effect a change in BP, however, it effects a significant increase in HR (68.4 ± 11.7 beats/min versus 85.4 ± 13.6 beats/min; P < 0.001) and a significant decline in MSNA (6.8 ± 1.1 bursts/15 s bin; P < 0.001 versus 3.6 ± 0.6 bursts/15 s bin) relative to baseline. Remarkably, among men MSNA rebounded to baseline levels within the first minute of recovery, however, in women, MSNA suppression persisted for 5 min. We show that in healthy young adults, high intensity, low volume respiratory training results in the acute suppression of MSNA. Importantly, MSNA suppression is of greater magnitude and longer duration in women than in men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1114-1121
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume130
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Respiratory training
  • Sympathetic activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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