Adolescent bicultural stress and its impact on mental well-being among Latinos, Asian Americans, and European Americans

Andrea J. Romero, Scorr C. Corvajol, Fabian Valle, Michele Orduña

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

The perception of bicultural stress, stress due to discrimination/ prejudice, immigration, and acculturation, was investigated in relation to mental well-being in a sample of urban Latino (n = 304), European American (n = 215), and Asian American (n - 311) 8th grade students. Bicultural stress was reported by all ethnic groups and was significantly associated with more depressive symptoms and less optimism (only for females), after accounting for ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, and age. Latino and Asian American youth were more likely to report more stressors, although after controlling for sociodemographic variables the differences predominantly remained only between Asian Americans and European Americans. Lower socioeconomic status, male gender, and not speaking English also were associated with more stress. The negative impact of bicultural stress on adolescent depressive symptoms and optimism indicates the need for mental health researchers and service providers to consider the cultural context of stress for adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-534
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adolescent bicultural stress and its impact on mental well-being among Latinos, Asian Americans, and European Americans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this