Adolescent Romance and Emotional Health in the United States: Beyond Binaries

Stephen T Russell, Theodora B. Consolacion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on adolescent same-sex sexuality has focused almost exclusively on risk in the lives of self-identified lesbians, gays, and bisexuals. The attention to same-sex self identity may obscure heterogeneity in same-sex romance (attractions and relationships) and thus may inaccurately characterize sexual-minority youth as more different than heterosexual youth in terms of emotional health risk. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we examine the nexus of romantic attractions and relationships among contemporary U.S. adolescents, linking experiences of romance to indicators of emotional health. We conclude that broadening the scope of inquiry beyond binaries of identity (that is, gay vs. straight) provides the opportunity to more fully understand the health and well-being of all adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-508
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Health
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Heterosexuality
Sexuality
Child Welfare
Sexual Minorities
Research
Nexus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Adolescent Romance and Emotional Health in the United States : Beyond Binaries. / Russell, Stephen T; Consolacion, Theodora B.

In: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Vol. 32, No. 4, 2003, p. 499-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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