Adolescent scoliosis: Effects of corrective surgery, cognitive-behavioral interventions, and age on activity outcomes

Lynda L. LaMontagne, Joseph T. Hepworth, Frances Cohen, Michele H. Salisbury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of spinal fusion surgery and cognitive-behavioral interventions on 88 adolescents' (11-18 years) activity outcomes were examined using a randomized trial with three intervention groups (information only, coping only, coping plus information) and a control group. The effects included a significant drop from baseline (preoperative) in usual activities and social activities at 1 month postsurgery for all groups, indicating that initially postsurgical recovery is particularly disruptive to patients' lives. At 3 months after surgery, all groups showed increased usual activities and social activities. Between the 3- and 6-month assessments, all groups had increases in social activities. Furthermore, the information only group had a significant increase in usual activities from 3 to 6 months. Younger adolescents (ages 11-14) in the combined information plus coping group and the control group had higher social scores over the postsurgery recovery period compared with those in the coping-only group. No differences were found on academic performance. The adolescents did not return to their baseline social activity levels during the 9-month recovery period (typically when long-term recovery is completed), indicating that the surgery itself has a long-term negative effect on patients' social life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-177
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adolescent scoliosis: Effects of corrective surgery, cognitive-behavioral interventions, and age on activity outcomes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this