Advanced imaging of multiple mRNAs in brain tissue using a custom hyperspectral imager and multivariate curve resolution

Vicki L. Sutherland, Jerilyn A. Timlin, Linda T. Nieman, John F. Guzowski, Monica K. Chawla, Paul F. Worley, Badri Roysam, Bruce L. McNaughton, Michael B. Sinclair, Carol A Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Simultaneous imaging of multiple cellular components is of tremendous importance in the study of complex biological systems, but the inability to use probes with similar emission spectra and the time consuming nature of collecting images on a confocal microscope are prohibitive. Hyperspectral imaging technology, originally developed for remote sensing applications, has been adapted to measure multiple genes in complex biological tissues. A spectral imaging microscope was used to acquire overlapping fluorescence emissions from specific mRNAs in brain tissue by scanning the samples using a single fluorescence excitation wavelength. The underlying component spectra obtained from the samples are then separated into their respective spectral signatures using multivariate analyses, enabling the simultaneous quantitative measurement of multiple genes either at regional or cellular levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-148
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume160
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2007

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Fluorescence
Messenger RNA
Brain
Genes
Multivariate Analysis
Technology

Keywords

  • Fluorescence imaging
  • Hyperspectral imaging
  • Immediate early genes
  • Multivariate image analysis
  • Pushbroom line-imaging
  • Spectral unmixing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Advanced imaging of multiple mRNAs in brain tissue using a custom hyperspectral imager and multivariate curve resolution. / Sutherland, Vicki L.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Nieman, Linda T.; Guzowski, John F.; Chawla, Monica K.; Worley, Paul F.; Roysam, Badri; McNaughton, Bruce L.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Barnes, Carol A.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 160, No. 1, 15.02.2007, p. 144-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sutherland, VL, Timlin, JA, Nieman, LT, Guzowski, JF, Chawla, MK, Worley, PF, Roysam, B, McNaughton, BL, Sinclair, MB & Barnes, CA 2007, 'Advanced imaging of multiple mRNAs in brain tissue using a custom hyperspectral imager and multivariate curve resolution', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, vol. 160, no. 1, pp. 144-148. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2006.08.018
Sutherland, Vicki L. ; Timlin, Jerilyn A. ; Nieman, Linda T. ; Guzowski, John F. ; Chawla, Monica K. ; Worley, Paul F. ; Roysam, Badri ; McNaughton, Bruce L. ; Sinclair, Michael B. ; Barnes, Carol A. / Advanced imaging of multiple mRNAs in brain tissue using a custom hyperspectral imager and multivariate curve resolution. In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods. 2007 ; Vol. 160, No. 1. pp. 144-148.
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