Advances in macromolecular data storage

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We propose to develop a new method of information storage to replace magnetic hard disk drives and other instruments of secondary/backup data storage. The proposed method stores petabytes of user-data in a sugar cube (1 cm3), and can read/write that information at hundreds of megabits/sec. Digital information is recorded and stored in the form of a long macromolecule consisting of at least two bases, A and B. (This would be similar to DNA strands constructed from the four nucleic acids G, C, A, T.) The macromolecules initially enter the system as blank slates. A macromolecule with, say, 10,000 identical bases in the form of AAAAA. . AAA may be used to record a kilobyte block of user-data (including modulation and error-correction coding), although, in this blank state, it can only represent the null sequence 00000.000. Suppose this blank string of A's is dragged before an atomically-sharp needle of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). When electric pulses are applied to the needle in accordance with the sequence of 0s and 1s of a 1 KB block of user-data, selected A molecules will be transformed into A molecules (e.g., a fraction of A will be broken off and discarded). The resulting string now encodes the user-data in the form of AABAA. . BAB. The same STM needle can subsequently read the recorded information, as A and B would produce different electric signals when the strand passes under the needle. The macromolecule now represents a data block to be stored in a "parking lot" within the sugar cube, and later brought to a read station on demand. Millions of parking spots and thousands of Read/Write stations may be integrated within the micro-fabricated sugar cube, thus providing access to petabytes of user-data in a scheme that benefits from the massive parallelism of thousands of Read/Write stations within the same three-dimensionally micro-structured device.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherSPIE
Volume9201
ISBN (Print)9781628412284
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
EventOptical Data Storage Conference, ODS 2014 - San Diego, United States
Duration: Aug 18 2014Aug 19 2014

Other

OtherOptical Data Storage Conference, ODS 2014
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period8/18/148/19/14

Fingerprint

Data Storage
data storage
Macromolecules
macromolecules
needles
Needles
blanks
sugars
Sugars
parking
Data storage equipment
stations
Parking
strands
Regular hexahedron
Microscopes
strings
microscopes
Scanning
electric pulses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Mansuripur, M. (2014). Advances in macromolecular data storage. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 9201). [92010A] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2060549

Advances in macromolecular data storage. / Mansuripur, Masud.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9201 SPIE, 2014. 92010A.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mansuripur, M 2014, Advances in macromolecular data storage. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 9201, 92010A, SPIE, Optical Data Storage Conference, ODS 2014, San Diego, United States, 8/18/14. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2060549
Mansuripur M. Advances in macromolecular data storage. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9201. SPIE. 2014. 92010A https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2060549
Mansuripur, Masud. / Advances in macromolecular data storage. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 9201 SPIE, 2014.
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