Advances in multiangle satellite remote sensing of speciated airborne particulate matter and association with adverse health effects: From MISR to MAIA

David J. Diner, Stacey W. Boland, Michael Brauer, Carol Bruegge, Kevin A. Burke, Russell A Chipman, Larry Di Girolamo, Michael J. Garay, Sina Hasheminassab, Edward Hyer, Michael Jerrett, Veljko Jovanovic, Olga V. Kalashnikova, Yang Liu, Alexei I. Lyapustin, Randall V. Martin, Abigail Nastan, Bart D. Ostro, Beate Ritz, Joel SchwartzJun Wang, Feng Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhalation of airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. However, the relative toxicity of specific PM types-mixtures of particles of varying sizes, shapes, and chemical compositions-is not well understood. A major impediment has been the sparse distribution of surface sensors, especially those measuring speciated PM. Aerosol remote sensing from Earth orbit offers the opportunity to improve our understanding of the health risks associated with different particle types and sources. The Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite has demonstrated the value of near-simultaneous observations of backscattered sunlight from multiple view angles for remote sensing of aerosol abundances and particle properties over land. The Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) instrument, currently in development, improves on MISR's sensitivity to airborne particle composition by incorporating polarimetry and expanded spectral range. Spatiotemporal regression relationships generated using collocated surface monitor and chemical transport model data will be used to convert fractional aerosol optical depths retrieved from MAIA observations to near-surface PM 10 , PM 2.5 , and speciated PM 2.5 . Health scientists on the MAIA team will use the resulting exposure estimates over globally distributed target areas to investigate the association of particle species with population health effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number042603
JournalJournal of Applied Remote Sensing
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

MISR
particulate matter
aerosol
remote sensing
Terra (satellite)
health risk
optical depth
effect
health
chemical composition
particle
sensor
toxicity

Keywords

  • aerosols
  • human health
  • particulate matter
  • remote sensing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Advances in multiangle satellite remote sensing of speciated airborne particulate matter and association with adverse health effects : From MISR to MAIA. / Diner, David J.; Boland, Stacey W.; Brauer, Michael; Bruegge, Carol; Burke, Kevin A.; Chipman, Russell A; Di Girolamo, Larry; Garay, Michael J.; Hasheminassab, Sina; Hyer, Edward; Jerrett, Michael; Jovanovic, Veljko; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Liu, Yang; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Martin, Randall V.; Nastan, Abigail; Ostro, Bart D.; Ritz, Beate; Schwartz, Joel; Wang, Jun; Xu, Feng.

In: Journal of Applied Remote Sensing, Vol. 12, No. 4, 042603, 01.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diner, DJ, Boland, SW, Brauer, M, Bruegge, C, Burke, KA, Chipman, RA, Di Girolamo, L, Garay, MJ, Hasheminassab, S, Hyer, E, Jerrett, M, Jovanovic, V, Kalashnikova, OV, Liu, Y, Lyapustin, AI, Martin, RV, Nastan, A, Ostro, BD, Ritz, B, Schwartz, J, Wang, J & Xu, F 2018, 'Advances in multiangle satellite remote sensing of speciated airborne particulate matter and association with adverse health effects: From MISR to MAIA', Journal of Applied Remote Sensing, vol. 12, no. 4, 042603. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.12.042603
Diner, David J. ; Boland, Stacey W. ; Brauer, Michael ; Bruegge, Carol ; Burke, Kevin A. ; Chipman, Russell A ; Di Girolamo, Larry ; Garay, Michael J. ; Hasheminassab, Sina ; Hyer, Edward ; Jerrett, Michael ; Jovanovic, Veljko ; Kalashnikova, Olga V. ; Liu, Yang ; Lyapustin, Alexei I. ; Martin, Randall V. ; Nastan, Abigail ; Ostro, Bart D. ; Ritz, Beate ; Schwartz, Joel ; Wang, Jun ; Xu, Feng. / Advances in multiangle satellite remote sensing of speciated airborne particulate matter and association with adverse health effects : From MISR to MAIA. In: Journal of Applied Remote Sensing. 2018 ; Vol. 12, No. 4.
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AU - Burke, Kevin A.

AU - Chipman, Russell A

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AU - Nastan, Abigail

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AU - Wang, Jun

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