Advantages of genomic complexity

Bioinformatics opportunities in microRNA cancer signatures

Yves A Lussier, Walter M. Stadler, James L. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

MicroRNAs, small non-coding RNAs, may act as tumor suppressors or oncogenes, and each regulate their own transcription and that of hundreds of genes, often in a tissue-dependent manner. This creates a tightly interwoven network regulating and underlying oncogenesis and cancer biology. Although protein-coding gene signatures and single protein pathway markers have proliferated over the past decade, routine adoption of the former has been hampered by interpretability, reproducibility, and dimensionality, whereas the single molecule-phenotype reductionism of the latter is often overly simplistic to account for complex phenotypes. MicroRNA-derived biomarkers offer a powerful alternative; they have both the flexibility of gene expression signature classifiers and the desirable mechanistic transparency of single protein biomarkers. Furthermore, several advances have recently demonstrated the robust detection of microRNAs from various biofluids, thus providing an additional opportunity for obtaining bioinformatically derived biomarkers to accelerate the identification of individual patients for personalized therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)156-160
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Computational Biology
MicroRNAs
Biomarkers
Phenotype
Small Untranslated RNA
Neoplasms
Proteins
Oncogenes
Transcriptome
Carcinogenesis
Genes
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Advantages of genomic complexity : Bioinformatics opportunities in microRNA cancer signatures. / Lussier, Yves A; Stadler, Walter M.; Chen, James L.

In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, Vol. 19, No. 2, 03.2012, p. 156-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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