Affect modulates appetite-related brain activity to images of food

William Killgore, Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We examined whether affect ratings predicted regional cerebral responses to high and low-calorie foods. Method: Thirteen normal-weight adult women viewed photographs of high and low-calorie foods while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Regression analysis was used to predict regional activation from positive and negative affect scores. Results: Positive and negative affect had different effects on several important appetite-related regions depending on the calorie content of the food images. When viewing high-calorie foods, positive affect was associated with increased activity in satiety-related regions of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, but when viewing low-calorie foods, positive affect was associated with increased activity in hunger-related regions including the medial orbitofrontal and insular cortex. The opposite pattern of activity was observed for negative affect. Conclusion: These findings suggest a neurobiologic substrate that may be involved in the commonly reported increase in cravings for calorie-dense foods during heightened negative emotions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-363
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

low calorie foods
Appetite
appetite
brain
Food
Brain
craving
hunger
emotions
satiety
Prefrontal Cortex
energy content
magnetic resonance imaging
photographs
cortex
regression analysis
Hunger
Cerebral Cortex
Emotions
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Anterior cingulate gyrus
  • Eating
  • Food
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Insula
  • Negative affect
  • Neuroimaging
  • Orbitofrontal cortex
  • Positive affect
  • Positive and Negative Affect Schedule

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Food Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Affect modulates appetite-related brain activity to images of food. / Killgore, William; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol. 39, No. 5, 07.2006, p. 357-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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