African American students at predominantly white institutions: A motivational and self-systems approach to understanding retention

Kelly A. Rodgers, Jessica J. Summers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Predominantly White institutions have not been as effective as historically Black institutions in retaining and conferring degrees upon African American college students. This review seeks to embed the psychological aspects of the retention process proposed by Bean and Eaton [A psychological model of college student retention. In J. M. Braxton (Ed.), Reworking the student departure puzzle (pp. 48-61). Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2000] in a culturally-sensitive framework and consider how African American students attending PWIs may experience the processes in retention. We first give a brief overview of Bean and Eaton's [A psychological model of college student retention. In J. M. Braxton (Ed.), Reworking the student departure puzzle (pp. 48-61). Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2000] model of retention, then we propose and discuss revisions to Bean and Eaton's model that we believe would make the model more applicable to African American students attending predominantly White institutions. Specifically, we address students' attitudes towards their institution, academic self-efficacy, motivation, achievement goals, attributions, and ethnic and bicultural identity development. The discussion concludes with implications and directions for future study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-190
Number of pages20
JournalEducational Psychology Review
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

Keywords

  • African American
  • College students
  • Higher education
  • Motivation
  • Retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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