AFTER 40 YEARS: REVISITING CEIBAL to INVESTIGATE the ORIGINS of LOWLAND MAYA CIVILIZATION

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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Abstract

The Ceibal-Petexbatun Archaeological Project has been conducting field investigations at the lowland Maya site of Ceibal since 2005. Previous research at this site by Harvard University allowed us to develop detailed research designs geared toward specific research questions. A particularly important focus was the question of how lowland Maya civilization emerged and developed. Comparison with contemporaneous sites in central Chiapas led us to hypothesize that the residents of Ceibal established a formal spatial pattern similar to those of the Chiapas centers during the Middle Preclassic period (1000-350 B.C.). Through excavations of important elements of this spatial pattern, including a probable E-Group assemblage and large platforms, we examined how the Ceibal residents participated in interregional interactions with Chiapas, the Gulf Coast, and other areas, and how construction activities and architecture shaped the course of social change.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages187-201
Number of pages15
JournalAncient Mesoamerica
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

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Chiapas
resident
Maya Lowlands
Spatial Pattern
Residents
civilization
research planning
social change
interaction
Group
Research Design
Archaeology
Interregional Interaction
Assemblages
Conducting
Civilization
Coast
Excavation
excavation
coast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

AFTER 40 YEARS : REVISITING CEIBAL to INVESTIGATE the ORIGINS of LOWLAND MAYA CIVILIZATION. / Inomata, Takeshi; Triadan, Daniela; Aoyama, Kazuo.

In: Ancient Mesoamerica, Vol. 28, No. 1, 2017, p. 187-201.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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