Age-composition change and the geographical dynamics of interregional migration in the US

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Abstract

Argues that the changing age composition of the nation's population has contributed significantly to recent major shifts in US interregional migration. To clarify the different ways that age-composition change has influenced such recent trends, three hypotheses are explored using a spatial shift-share decomposition model. The model first demonstrates that the significantly larger cohorts of the baby boom generation supplied a basis for the 1970s migration shifts, but the geography of the baby boom does not, by itself, provide a sufficient explanation. Secondly, it discloses notable changes in age-specific mobility rates consistent with economic theories about the repercussions of disparities in the sizes of successive generations. I suggest that heightened demographic effectiveness of channels of population interchange has resulted from the differential abilities of regional labor markets to accommodate the labor-supply pressure caused by members of the baby boom generation seeking entry-level jobs. -from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnals - Association of American Geographers
Pages64-85
Number of pages22
Volume82
Edition1
Publication statusPublished - 1992

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Plane, D. (1992). Age-composition change and the geographical dynamics of interregional migration in the US. In Annals - Association of American Geographers (1 ed., Vol. 82, pp. 64-85)