Aging of the T cell compartment in mice and humans: from no naive expectations to foggy memories

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Until the mid-20th century, infectious diseases were the major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Massive vaccination campaigns, antibiotics, antivirals, and advanced public health measures drastically reduced sickness and death from infections in children and younger adults. However, older adults (>65 y of age) remain vulnerable to infections, and infectious diseases remain among the top 5-10 causes of death in this population. The aging of the immune system, often referred to as immune senescence, is the key phenomenon underlying this vulnerability. This review centers on age-related changes in T cells, which are dramatically and reproducibly altered with aging. I discuss changes in T cell production, maintenance, function, and response to latent persistent infection, particularly against CMV, which exerts a profound influence on the aging T cell pool, concluding with a brief list of measures to improve immune function in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2622-2629
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume193
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2014

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T-Lymphocytes
Communicable Diseases
Infection
Immunization Programs
Antiviral Agents
Young Adult
Cause of Death
Immune System
Public Health
Maintenance
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Morbidity
Mortality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Aging of the T cell compartment in mice and humans : from no naive expectations to foggy memories. / Nikolich-Zugich, Janko.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 193, No. 6, 15.09.2014, p. 2622-2629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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