Aging with a traumatic brain injury: Could behavioral morbidities and endocrine symptoms be influenced by microglial priming?

Jenna M. Ziebell, Rachel K. Rowe, Megan M. Muccigrosso, Jack T. Reddaway, P. David Adelson, Jonathan P. Godbout, Jonathan Lifshitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A myriad of factors influence the developmental and aging process and impact health and life span. Mounting evidence indicates that brain injury, even moderate injury, can lead to lifetime of physical and mental health symptoms. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to discuss how recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI) depends on age-at-injury and how aging with a TBI affects long-term recovery. TBI initiates pathophysiological processes that dismantle circuits in the brain. In response, reparative and restorative processes reorganize circuits to overcome the injury-induced damage. The extent of circuit dismantling and subsequent reorganization depends as much on the initial injury parameters as other contributing factors, such as genetics and age. Age-at-injury influences the way the brain is able to repair itself, as a result of developmental status, extent of cellular senescence, and injury-induced inflammation. Moreover, endocrine dysfunction can occur with TBI. Depending on the age of the individual at the time of injury, endocrine dysfunction may disrupt growth, puberty, influence social behaviors, and possibly alter the inflammatory response. In turn, activation of microglia, the brain's immune cells, after injury may continue to fuel endocrine dysfunction. With age, the immune system develops and microglia become primed to subsequent challenges. Sustained inflammation and microglial activation can continue for weeks to months post-injury. This prolonged inflammation can influence developmental processes, behavioral performance and age-related decline. Overall, brain injury may influence the aging process and expedite glial and neuronal alterations that impact mental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 4 2015

Fingerprint

Morbidity
Wounds and Injuries
Microglia
Inflammation
Brain Injuries
Mental Health
Brain
Traumatic Brain Injury
Social Behavior
Cell Aging
Puberty
Neuroglia
Immune System
Health
Growth

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cognition
  • Endocrine dysfunction
  • Inflammation
  • Microglia
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Cite this

Aging with a traumatic brain injury : Could behavioral morbidities and endocrine symptoms be influenced by microglial priming? / Ziebell, Jenna M.; Rowe, Rachel K.; Muccigrosso, Megan M.; Reddaway, Jack T.; Adelson, P. David; Godbout, Jonathan P.; Lifshitz, Jonathan.

In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 04.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ziebell, Jenna M. ; Rowe, Rachel K. ; Muccigrosso, Megan M. ; Reddaway, Jack T. ; Adelson, P. David ; Godbout, Jonathan P. ; Lifshitz, Jonathan. / Aging with a traumatic brain injury : Could behavioral morbidities and endocrine symptoms be influenced by microglial priming?. In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. 2015.
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