Airway Obstruction Worsens in Young Adults with Asthma Who Become Obese

Childhood Asthma Management Program Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Few studies have examined how developing obesity in early adulthood affects the course of asthma. Objective: We analyzed lung function and asthma impairment and risk among nonobese children with asthma, comparing those who were obese in young adulthood with those who remained nonobese. Methods: We carried out the post hoc analysis of 771 subjects with mild to moderate asthma who were not obese (pediatric definition, body mass index [BMI] <95th percentile) when enrolled in the Childhood Asthma Management Program at ages 5-12 years. The subjects were then followed to age 20 years or more. For visits at ages 20 years or more, spirometry values as percent predicted and recent asthma symptom scores and prednisone exposure were compared between 579 subjects who were nonobese at all visits and 151 who were obese (adult definition of BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) on at least 1 visit (median number of visits when obese = 4, IQR 2-7). Results: Compared with participants who were nonobese (BMI 23.4 ± 2.6 kg/m2), those who became obese (BMI 31.5 ± 3.8 kg/m2) had significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) (P <.0003) and FEV1 (P = .001), without differences in FVC (P = .15) during visits at ages 20 years or more. For each unit increase of BMI, FEV1 percent predicted decreased by 0.29 (P = .0009). The relationship between BMI and lung function was not confounded by sex or BMI at baseline. Asthma impairment (symptom scores) and risk (prednisone use) did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Becoming obese in early adulthood was associated with increased airway obstruction, without impact on asthma impairment or risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)765-771.e2
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Airway Obstruction
Young Adult
Asthma
Body Mass Index
Vital Capacity
Prednisone
Lung
Spirometry
Forced Expiratory Volume
Obesity
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Childhood asthma
  • Childhood obesity
  • Obese asthma
  • Pulmonary function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Airway Obstruction Worsens in Young Adults with Asthma Who Become Obese. / Childhood Asthma Management Program Research Group.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Vol. 3, No. 5, 01.09.2015, p. 765-771.e2.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Childhood Asthma Management Program Research Group. / Airway Obstruction Worsens in Young Adults with Asthma Who Become Obese. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. 2015 ; Vol. 3, No. 5. pp. 765-771.e2.
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abstract = "Background: Few studies have examined how developing obesity in early adulthood affects the course of asthma. Objective: We analyzed lung function and asthma impairment and risk among nonobese children with asthma, comparing those who were obese in young adulthood with those who remained nonobese. Methods: We carried out the post hoc analysis of 771 subjects with mild to moderate asthma who were not obese (pediatric definition, body mass index [BMI] <95th percentile) when enrolled in the Childhood Asthma Management Program at ages 5-12 years. The subjects were then followed to age 20 years or more. For visits at ages 20 years or more, spirometry values as percent predicted and recent asthma symptom scores and prednisone exposure were compared between 579 subjects who were nonobese at all visits and 151 who were obese (adult definition of BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) on at least 1 visit (median number of visits when obese = 4, IQR 2-7). Results: Compared with participants who were nonobese (BMI 23.4 ± 2.6 kg/m2), those who became obese (BMI 31.5 ± 3.8 kg/m2) had significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) (P <.0003) and FEV1 (P = .001), without differences in FVC (P = .15) during visits at ages 20 years or more. For each unit increase of BMI, FEV1 percent predicted decreased by 0.29 (P = .0009). The relationship between BMI and lung function was not confounded by sex or BMI at baseline. Asthma impairment (symptom scores) and risk (prednisone use) did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Becoming obese in early adulthood was associated with increased airway obstruction, without impact on asthma impairment or risk.",
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AU - Childhood Asthma Management Program Research Group

AU - Strunk, Robert C.

AU - Colvin, Ryan

AU - Bacharier, Leonard B.

AU - Fuhlbrigge, Anne

AU - Forno, Erick

AU - Arbelaez, Ana Maria

AU - Tantisira, Kelan G.

AU - Williams, Paul

AU - Lasley, Mary V.

AU - Chinn, Tamara

AU - Hinatsu, Michele

AU - Furukawa, Clifton T.

AU - Altman, Leonard C.

AU - Virant, Frank S.

AU - Kennedy, Michael S.

AU - Tilles, Stephen

AU - Becker, Jonathan W.

AU - Bierman, C. Warren

AU - Crawford, Dan

AU - DuHamel, Thomas

AU - Eliassen, Heather

AU - Hammond, Babi

AU - MacLaren, Miranda

AU - Minotti, Dominick A.

AU - Reagan, Chris

AU - Shapiro, Gail

AU - Sharpe, Marian

AU - Tatum, Ashley

AU - White, Grace

AU - Wighton, Timothy G.

AU - Plunkett, Anne

AU - Madden, Nancy

AU - Anderson, Susan

AU - Boehnert, Mark

AU - Feins, Anita

AU - Gentile, Amanda

AU - Kandror, Natalia

AU - MacAulay, Kelly

AU - Sampong, Ernestina

AU - Weiss, Scott

AU - Torda, Walter

AU - Tata, Martha

AU - Babigian, Sally

AU - Barrant, Peter

AU - Benson, Linda

AU - Caicedo, Jose

AU - Calder, Tatum

AU - Darcy, Christine

AU - DeFilippo, Anthony

AU - Grad, Roni

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Background: Few studies have examined how developing obesity in early adulthood affects the course of asthma. Objective: We analyzed lung function and asthma impairment and risk among nonobese children with asthma, comparing those who were obese in young adulthood with those who remained nonobese. Methods: We carried out the post hoc analysis of 771 subjects with mild to moderate asthma who were not obese (pediatric definition, body mass index [BMI] <95th percentile) when enrolled in the Childhood Asthma Management Program at ages 5-12 years. The subjects were then followed to age 20 years or more. For visits at ages 20 years or more, spirometry values as percent predicted and recent asthma symptom scores and prednisone exposure were compared between 579 subjects who were nonobese at all visits and 151 who were obese (adult definition of BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) on at least 1 visit (median number of visits when obese = 4, IQR 2-7). Results: Compared with participants who were nonobese (BMI 23.4 ± 2.6 kg/m2), those who became obese (BMI 31.5 ± 3.8 kg/m2) had significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) (P <.0003) and FEV1 (P = .001), without differences in FVC (P = .15) during visits at ages 20 years or more. For each unit increase of BMI, FEV1 percent predicted decreased by 0.29 (P = .0009). The relationship between BMI and lung function was not confounded by sex or BMI at baseline. Asthma impairment (symptom scores) and risk (prednisone use) did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Becoming obese in early adulthood was associated with increased airway obstruction, without impact on asthma impairment or risk.

AB - Background: Few studies have examined how developing obesity in early adulthood affects the course of asthma. Objective: We analyzed lung function and asthma impairment and risk among nonobese children with asthma, comparing those who were obese in young adulthood with those who remained nonobese. Methods: We carried out the post hoc analysis of 771 subjects with mild to moderate asthma who were not obese (pediatric definition, body mass index [BMI] <95th percentile) when enrolled in the Childhood Asthma Management Program at ages 5-12 years. The subjects were then followed to age 20 years or more. For visits at ages 20 years or more, spirometry values as percent predicted and recent asthma symptom scores and prednisone exposure were compared between 579 subjects who were nonobese at all visits and 151 who were obese (adult definition of BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) on at least 1 visit (median number of visits when obese = 4, IQR 2-7). Results: Compared with participants who were nonobese (BMI 23.4 ± 2.6 kg/m2), those who became obese (BMI 31.5 ± 3.8 kg/m2) had significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) (P <.0003) and FEV1 (P = .001), without differences in FVC (P = .15) during visits at ages 20 years or more. For each unit increase of BMI, FEV1 percent predicted decreased by 0.29 (P = .0009). The relationship between BMI and lung function was not confounded by sex or BMI at baseline. Asthma impairment (symptom scores) and risk (prednisone use) did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Becoming obese in early adulthood was associated with increased airway obstruction, without impact on asthma impairment or risk.

KW - Childhood asthma

KW - Childhood obesity

KW - Obese asthma

KW - Pulmonary function

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