Alcohol outlet density and university student drinking: A national study

Kypros Kypri, Melanie L Bell, Geoff C. Hay, Joanne Baxter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To examine the geographic density of alcohol outlets and associations with drinking levels and related problems among university students. Design: Cross-sectional survey study using geospatial data, with campus-level and individual-level analyses. Participants: A total of 2550 students (mean age 20.2, 60% women) at six university campuses in New Zealand (63% response). Measurements: Counts of alcohol outlets within 3 km of each campus were tested for their non-parametric correlation with aggregated campus drinking levels and related problems. Generalized estimating equations were used to model the relation between outlet counts within 1 km and 3 km of student residences and individual drinking levels/problems, with control for gender, age, ethnicity and high school binge drinking frequency, and adjustment for campus-level clustering. Findings: Correlations for campus-level data were 0.77 (P = 0.07) for drinking and personal problems, and 0.31 (P = 0.54) for second-hand effects. There were consistent significant associations of both on- and off-licence outlet densities with all outcomes in student-level adjusted models. Effects were largest for 1 km densities and off-licence outlets. Conclusions: There are positive associations between alcohol outlet density and individual drinking and related problems. Associations remain after controlling for demographic variables and pre-university drinking, i.e. the associations are unlikely to be due to self-selection effects. Increasing alcohol outlet density, and particularly off-licences, may increase alcohol-related harm among university students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1131-1138
Number of pages8
JournalAddiction
Volume103
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drinking
Alcohols
Students
Licensure
Cross-Sectional Studies
Binge Drinking
New Zealand
Cluster Analysis
Alcohol Drinking in College
Hand
Demography

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol-related harm
  • College
  • Drinking
  • Environment
  • Outlet density
  • Problems
  • Students
  • University

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Alcohol outlet density and university student drinking : A national study. / Kypri, Kypros; Bell, Melanie L; Hay, Geoff C.; Baxter, Joanne.

In: Addiction, Vol. 103, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 1131-1138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kypri, Kypros ; Bell, Melanie L ; Hay, Geoff C. ; Baxter, Joanne. / Alcohol outlet density and university student drinking : A national study. In: Addiction. 2008 ; Vol. 103, No. 7. pp. 1131-1138.
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